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 Post subject: modernising an old bike
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:03 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 8:31 pm
Posts: 473
I have a concorde running 6 speed campag. It currently has tubs on record hubs but I want something more resilient for winter commuting.

What are my options but keeping as much as possible?

thanks


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:52 pm 
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Run it through the winter with the old gear on it as it will get a thrashing with the salt


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 2:36 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
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Location: New Forest, UK
The Record hubs are about as good as it gets - the odd squirt of grease into the ports should keep them smooth.
However I'd look for a cheap set of screw-on hub wheels and a cheap freewheel as disposable winter runners shod with Conti Gatorskins. A lot depends on how long your commute is though. I'd probably pick an MTB with slicks or semi-slicks and mudguards provided it was less than 10 miles each way.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 4:22 pm 
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the commute is around 18 miles each way and I really want to enjoy it.

I don't mind using less decent wheels - is ebay the best place for this, but shall I put a wanted ad?

Also what am I supposed to be asking for - 126mm hubs, with screwon campagnolo and getting a second 6 speed chainrings?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 5:19 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
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Location: New Forest, UK
I'd check the rear width (between the insides of the dropouts) - most likely 126mm, but 120mm is possible. Then look around here first of course. I'd go for any old screw-on freewheel, there is no point trashing a nice one in the salt.

Fitting mudguards if at all possible saves headset, seat tube / post, brake callipers and bottom bracket from being sprayed with dirty water (plus your backside). Things will last much longer as a result.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:03 pm 
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Plenty of cheap wheels about but many will be cheap for a reason. You could get you current hubs rebuilt onto modern clincher rims like a mavic Open Pro, Ambrosio Evolution, H plus Son TB14 to name but a few and then you can have the convienence of inner tubes. Or carry a spare tub or too and just ride.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 2013 8:56 am 
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I like the idea of riding tubs especially after that thread on it. I.will wait and see what the bike is like and then figure out what to do. It's a bummer that I have shimano and campagnolo, would have been nice just to run one.

Also what us the difference between large and small flange hubs? Is it something I need to consider?

Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 7:49 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 12:31 am
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Location: London
You can use nice stuff in winter and doesn't mean it'll get thrashed, you just have to do more maintenance and more cleaning. You could carry on using the wheels or get another pair for tyres, I don't agree with rebuilding with modern looking rims for use on an old bike.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 8:31 pm 
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Location: Cumbria
Large flange hubs = shorter spokes = more rigid = better power transfer = less energy loss = stiffer ride = better looking :)

Not a lot in it really.

Shaun


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2013 9:41 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8204
Location: New Forest, UK
That assumes that the force to stretch the spokes is lost. In reality the spokes relax a little between pedal strokes and put the energy back into turning the wheel. Hysteresis losses in stainless steel are small. If the spokes were rubber it would be a different matter.


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