Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sat Dec 03, 2016 12:45 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: New experience
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 10:18 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 17, 2013 10:25 pm
Posts: 1262
So with the wet cold weather upon us and the clock about to change we have to think about not letting what little fitness we've gained over the summer months completely disappear over the winter. Turbo trainer seems to be the most common and I have my original steel framed counterweight/fan type trainer from the 80s which I loathed then and even more so now. About 10 years ago I bought a Minoura trainer hoping to get back into cycling but it was so darned hard to pedal that it put me off for another 10 years. I remember back in the 80s trying to get hold of some rollers, but with no internet back then and lack of funds it never happened. I did however manage to acquire some conveyor rollers from the production line of the company that I worked and attempted to bodge up a set, but the rollers were too thin and the belt system unreliable so the idea was abandoned.

Last week I was offered some second hand Tacx rollers for a good price so I snatched them up and brought them home, well aware that they are difficult to use for the novice. A quick cycle in the lounge/hall doorway on Friday completing my worst ever mile and I decided I needed more than a few minutes to get the hang of these. Yesterday I took the rollers out to the garage and set them up beside the ramp, this gave me something that I could hold onto until I had the confidence to go it alone. I managed to do 10 difficult shaky miles gripping the handlebars as if my life depended on it and called it a day. Tonight I managed to do a wobbly 15 miles and came off the front roller for the first time. Concentration is definitely required all the time, unlike the turbo where you just sit there and pedal.

If anyone has any tips on roller techniques I would like to hear them

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 10:42 pm 
Dirt Disciple
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2012 3:18 pm
Posts: 98
Location: alfreton
47p2 wrote:
So with the wet cold weather upon us and the clock about to change we have to think about not letting what little fitness we've gained over the summer months completely disappear over the winter. Turbo trainer seems to be the most common and I have my original steel framed counterweight/fan type trainer from the 80s which I loathed then and even more so now. About 10 years ago I bought a Minoura trainer hoping to get back into cycling but it was so darned hard to pedal that it put me off for another 10 years. I remember back in the 80s trying to get hold of some rollers, but with no internet back then and lack of funds it never happened. I did however manage to acquire some conveyor rollers from the production line of the company that I worked and attempted to bodge up a set, but the rollers were too thin and the belt system unreliable so the idea was abandoned.

Last week I was offered some second hand Tacx rollers for a good price so I snatched them up and brought them home, well aware that they are difficult to use for the novice. A quick cycle in the lounge/hall doorway on Friday completing my worst ever mile and I decided I needed more than a few minutes to get the hang of these. Yesterday I took the rollers out to the garage and set them up beside the ramp, this gave me something that I could hold onto until I had the confidence to go it alone. I managed to do 10 difficult shaky miles gripping the handlebars as if my life depended on it and called it a day. Tonight I managed to do a wobbly 15 miles and came off the front roller for the first time. Concentration is definitely required all the time, unlike the turbo where you just sit there and pedal.

If anyone has any tips on roller techniques I would like to hear them

Image

Have tried turbo trainers before but find them to boring,i would rather get me thermals and waterproofs on if only for a short run than stare at walls,it's just not the same.


Last edited by casper2788 on Mon Oct 21, 2013 10:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 10:44 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8223
Location: Cumbria
Used rollers in the 70's, suddenly everything just clicked, I stopped staring down at the front wheel on the rollers and it became second nature............then the boredom set in :(

Do you stare down at the front wheel?

The rollers need to be further apart IMHO

Shaun


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 10:46 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 17, 2013 10:25 pm
Posts: 1262
Took that picture yesterday Shaun, I spread them a tad more tonight before using them.

I don't stare at the front wheel but keep watch a few feet ahead


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 10:53 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8223
Location: Cumbria
That's good then, maybe increase cadence a touch to avoid weaving but not so much that you start bouncing. Believe me it will suddenly click and you will wonder how other people say it's hard to ride rollers :D

Check again that the contact with the front wheel is the same as it would be on the road. Remember it's the caster action that keeps you upright.

Shaun


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:12 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 17, 2013 10:25 pm
Posts: 1262
I used a spirit level to ensure the front axle was in the centre of the roller :shock: :lol: :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:42 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
rider | rBoTM Winner
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:42 pm
Posts: 5131
Location: Wakefield, Yorkshire
Just relax. If you're uptight and nervous then it will be difficult. Familiarity will soon settle in and it will soon be as easy as riding a bike :wink:

If you've ever watched the film on Eddie Merckx taken while at his prime there is a session with him on the rollers and you won't believe his RPM (or the amount he sweats!).

I used to be able to ride no hands and take off a jersey etc. I haven't ridden them for years now but might have a go again soon - if the drive belt is still up to it!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 2:14 am 
r.B.o.T.M. & P.o.T.M. Winner
r.B.o.T.M. & P.o.T.M. Winner
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2007 10:51 am
Posts: 2209
Location: Camel Land
Just keep riding them as with practice you'll be riding them no handed soon as roolers really improve your balance & bike handling skills.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:36 am 
PoTM Winner
PoTM Winner
User avatar

Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 7:21 pm
Posts: 1156
Your front roller needs to go forward.

After a while you will ride them no hands. I used to read a book on mine.

They are no more engaging to train on than a turbo, you are just in the honeymoon period.

The turbo gives a better training loads and I find if I vary the programme the turbo offers a range training choices but I never train for more than an hour indoors.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: New experience
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:44 am 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:04 pm
Posts: 3363
Location: Completely in the dark, thanks to me good mate Terry....
Nob wrote:
Just keep riding them as with practice you'll be riding them no handed soon as roolers really improve your balance & bike handling skills.


Surprisingly I still can't ride mine no-hands after 22 years!! They are, however, great for developing balance, handling and supple pedalling - as a CX racer I regard them as a brilliant training aid.

Oh, and they do a great job of acting as a van der Graaff generator - when you come to a stop, be careful what you steady yourself against, as a good earth connection will result in a hefty static electricity shock. Been there, done that!

David


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: mr_gumby and 16 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group