Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Fri Dec 09, 2016 8:53 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:34 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6852
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
As the title really.

I have a nice Campag Record rear hub complete with a fitted freewheel which I want to change. The trouble is, the person I got the hub from didn't loosen the freewheel before cutting all the spokes and removing the rim.

I have the correct removal tool, and a decent vice, but thus far, not a hint of movement.

Any suggestions before I resort to power tools and brutality?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:50 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2012 2:08 pm
Posts: 2186
Location: Shrewsbury
That will be near impossible to remove and hold some good chances of scratching or damaging the hub in the attempt.

The only way I know is to quickly build up the wheel with an old rim.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:54 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Thu Apr 17, 2008 1:24 am
Posts: 7563
Location: Manchester
At the centre of the hub are the sides parallel or is it curved?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:56 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2010 7:07 pm
Posts: 1324
Location: Cotswolds
You will need to put some spokes in the gear side of the hub, OK all in the same direction. If you can't get the spokes in behind the freewheel then cut the heads off some (old) spokes and shape a double bend instead.
Best to use a rigid rim and have the freewheel remover in a vice. I used to do this bit of magic quite frequently.
Keith


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 6:45 am 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6852
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
The centre of the hub is parallel, but there is no way I am going to try clamping the hub.

I'll have to get hold of some old spokes. :facepalm:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:18 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2010 7:07 pm
Posts: 1324
Location: Cotswolds
I used to find 6 to 8 spokes spaced out enough.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:22 am 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6852
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
That's a great help, thanks Keith. :mrgreen:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 11:04 am 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Thu Apr 17, 2008 1:24 am
Posts: 7563
Location: Manchester
NeilM wrote:
The centre of the hub is parallel, but there is no way I am going to try clamping the hub.

I'll have to get hold of some old spokes. :facepalm:



I was meaning bore out a tube to the correct size, put some flats on it, then cut in half then clamp it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 4:07 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:10 pm
Posts: 669
Here's what I do- Apologies for the crap pictures!

First, get the locknut off the freewheel and completely dismantle it, leaving just the core threaded (stuck!) onto the hub, then get the Plus-Gas stuff, and let it soak in a while..

You can gently squeeze the rim of the core a few times in the vice, which may help to break the bond, like in the picture...

Image

Then mount the hub horizontally in the vice, securely, but not 'crack your flanges' securely, and use the removal tool, or a large adjustable spanner tightened onto the pawl-housings, because in this case, the slots for the removal tool were f*cked! Better leverage here, anyway- and one less component (the removal tool) to worry about..

Image

I didn't use soft jaw inserts in the vice, because I didn't want the hub to slip in the vice when I applied leverage. Consequently I ended up with some 'prints' from the vice-jaws on the rim of the hub-flanges- the lesser of two evils. My hub wasn't a nice old Campag. You may not want to leave such prints on yours, in which case best to go with the Keithglos method.

Image

Then you can rebuild the freewheel... :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 4:24 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8247
Location: Cumbria
BITD we used the "Keighglos" technique.......as mentioned it's tricky with a big cog as you have to king the spokes to lock them in as you can't thread them through the holes. We kept an old steel rim meant for rod brakes which was virtually unbendable to lace it to. Don't have to use that many spoke either........

Not sure I'd like to stick my hubs in a vice like that.

Shaun


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Apple Tree, Bing [Bot], Piperdave and 21 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group