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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:34 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Jun 24, 2012 11:01 pm
Posts: 46
Thanks Tel, that's good to know.

Having seen some restored Campagnolo seatpins on Ebay that have been given a mirror finish I assumed that they'd had the anodising removed.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:36 pm 
Road Moderator
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Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 1:07 pm
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Location: Sheppey, Kent
No they've just been highly polished.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:42 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2013 8:06 am
Posts: 723
There are several 'how to' and home anodising kits on eBay.
I've used this company to re anodize a Super Record headset and
brake calipers before and they do stunning work. And in 15 different colours.

http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item.vi ... 0971704167


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 7:12 am 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 3:03 pm
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What other Campagnolo parts were not anodised Tel ?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 9:15 am 
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Only other parts that I can think of are hubs.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 9:17 am 
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Oh and some mechs like Victory, front mechs also went through varying degrees of anodising, obviously the cage has almost always been chromed steel.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 5:13 pm 
Newbie

Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 6:32 am
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In the case of a part like an old style Record crank arm you may be improving the reliability of the part by careful de-burring, smoothing, and polishing. Some of those drive arms (especially from the "boom" years of the early 70's) can be full of sharp edges and stress risers, that could eventually lead to cracks. But the idea is to "blend" the surface and remove hard angles not just make it pretty.

A part exposed to sea-air, salt, etc, will do just as badly if anodized. Worse sometimes as the oxidation starts under the anodizing and digs in. I've stripped many Campagnolo cranks that have had very deep pits form under the anodizing. The key is keep your parts clean whether bare alloy or anodized, if you want them to hold up.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 7:13 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
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Location: Cumbria
Not a probem with producing a Beilby layer on the surface IMHO

Shaun


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 8:28 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 2:49 pm
Posts: 2578
Location: Boiling in a Bivvy Bag
I must have polished perhaps hundreds of parts by hand over the years, due to something of an obsession with having Campag/Royce type finish on all components :oops:
One thing I've learned is that 6000 series aluminium seems a lot less prone to corrosion - so much so that some parts are sold un-anodised, yet are able to retain a polish and resist oxidation for years; think Campag and White Industry hubs, some rims, Victory and Triomphe mech's and shifters, certain Paul Component parts etc.
Unfortunately '6000' alum' lacks the durability and fatigue resistance needed, so is never (as far as I'm aware) used for quality cranksets.
All the cranks I've polished have at varying speeds started to corrode. On an MTB in offroad conditions this can begin to happen immediately. I've managed to keep one Campag Centaur crank looking respectable by regular attention and only light use, but another set is now so deeply corroded that even aggressive re-polishing would be ineffectual. Anodizing is used for a reason!
Interestingly, several companies refused to engrave or laser etch their logos bitd, believing that it would lead to corrosion, or could cause stress risers. (I'm looking at a black 3TTT stem at the moment - it's in mint condition apart from the etched logo which is all corroded and furred up through the anodising.)

There are apparently several surface treatments/waxes available that work well at preventing oxidation though. The car boys are the experts here and seem to have success with their beloved alloys. A chap on this forum was enthusiastically recommending something a while ago, I'll post a link if I can find the thread.

edit. here 'tis: Poorboys wheel wax ...see 'lewis1641' comment at bottom of thread: viewtopic.php?f=7&t=197564


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 11:45 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Location: Cumbria
Don't get me going on car waxes..........I have a wax for my wheels......

http://www.swissvax.co.uk/product_detai ... ax_200ml_2

Don't laugh but I have spent more on wax for my car over the last ten years with this company to buy me half a dozen bikes.

I have an idea that their best wax is about £1200 a tub :)

Shaun


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