Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sat Dec 10, 2016 11:19 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 5:22 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 2922
Location: Dorset
A quick one this, on a roadbike with a twin ring crank, should you use the big ring along with the big gear on the cassette ?

I always thought this was a no-no as it would stretch the chain ???


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 5:26 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8247
Location: Cumbria
"crossing over" (big ring, big cog.........small ring, small cog) increases drivechain wear and can be a bit noisy so not recommended for long periods.

For 5 speeds I'm not sure how relevant it is as the size of the freewheel is small but still best avoided if possible.

Shaun


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 5:34 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 2922
Location: Dorset
The reason i ask, is that i was out with my usual cycling buddy and a couple of his workmates tagged along, i watched them climbing a hill which i struggle on and they were using the bit ring and the big cog, whereas i was using the small ring and big cog.

They were on 20 speed Carbon Giants though and i was on real steel 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:29 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:25 pm
Posts: 1787
Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
Not recommended, but IMHO big ring and big sprocket is a bit softer on the drive train than small ring small sprocket which
have a much smaller chain wrap radius. Modern chains and profiled teeth have made it less taboo. They may have
been riding a compact chainset which is designed without redundancy at the expense of decent chain lines.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 7:32 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 2922
Location: Dorset
They were riding compact chainsets.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 8:39 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
rider | rBoTM Winner
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:42 pm
Posts: 5133
Location: Wakefield, Yorkshire
Modern 10 speed chains are more flexible than older style ones and it isn't such a big issue these days. I find a lot of riders doing it as it does give a smoother ride than small/small.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 8:41 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:31 pm
Posts: 743
Generally it creates a poor chain line. In theory any chain line that isn't straight is wrong but that would screw up the derailleur principle wouldn't it?
Actually I find 10 speed stuff is more tolerant than older stuff. Narrower chains may be the reason.
Anyway. By all normal rules they were wrong. You should tell them so in no uncertain terms.
Bet they were "new" cyclists without a traditional club upbringing. :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 8:45 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 2922
Location: Dorset
mattsccm wrote:
Generally it creates a poor chain line. In theory any chain line that isn't straight is wrong but that would screw up the derailleur principle wouldn't it?
Actually I find 10 speed stuff is more tolerant than older stuff. Narrower chains may be the reason.
Anyway. By all normal rules they were wrong. You should tell them so in no uncertain terms.
Bet they were "new" cyclists without a traditional club upbringing. :lol:


I told them, it goes against everything I truly believe in :P

And yes (although I am not knocking them for riding) they were kids from the Wiggo effect who just walked into their local LBS with their credit card and walked out with a Carbon bike and £500 worth of fashionable clothes :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 02, 2013 3:37 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2012 1:23 pm
Posts: 104
Woz wrote:
They may have been riding a compact chainset which is designed without redundancy at the expense of decent chain lines.

You mean over a triple chainset, right?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 02, 2013 3:42 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
rider | rBoTM Winner
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:42 pm
Posts: 5133
Location: Wakefield, Yorkshire
mattsccm wrote:
Bet they were "new" cyclists without a traditional club upbringing. :lol:


A lot of my very experienced cycling mates do it all the time but it seems very rarely that they use the small chainring at all!

Like I said above, modern chains are very flexible so it's not nearly so bad a practice as it used to be.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Andy B, dorset boy, mr_gumby and 35 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group