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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 12:43 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2008 1:01 pm
Posts: 328
I have to remove 3 different Maillard freewheels and pions.
Does anyone know which tools i need?
I want to buy them so that i can use them also in the future.
I prefer a onlineshop or Ebay in Europe.
Or if anyone has a used tool for sale, no problem, let me know.

Situation 1:
Image

Situation 2:
Image

Situation 3:
Image


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 12:57 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 11:24 am
Posts: 194
Location: London SW
The top two need Park Tool FR-2
The bottom one probably needs Park Tool FR-4, but I am not 100%


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 1:20 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8230
Location: Cumbria
Is the top one actually attached to a rim......... ?

Shaun


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:05 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2008 1:01 pm
Posts: 328
Midlife wrote:
Is the top one actually attached to a rim......... ?

Shaun
No,

Its only the hub and pion, it's not attached anymore in a wheel.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:41 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 11:24 am
Posts: 194
Location: London SW
DayWalker wrote:
Midlife wrote:
Is the top one actually attached to a rim......... ?

Shaun
No,

Its only the hub and pion, it's not attached anymore in a wheel.


Then I'm afraid you won't be able to take that one off... I had a similar case... I have tried to clamp it to the bench vice, I have tried to bake it in the oven at 100 degrees and I even tried to freeze it in liquid nitrogen... I then ran out of ideas


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:42 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8230
Location: Cumbria
If it's not attached to a rim it's a bit of a nightmare............what's a pion by the way?

Shaun


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 2:55 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
Posts: 2367
ugo.santalucia wrote:
Then I'm afraid you won't be able to take that one off... I had a similar case... I have tried to clamp it to the bench vice, I have tried to bake it in the oven at 100 degrees and I even tried to freeze it in liquid nitrogen... I then ran out of ideas
I just laced it into an old rim we had in the shop, only half the spokes, in one direction (to take the load), not trued, tensioned or anything. It was a bit wobbly but came off ok.

Customer got the pi55 taken out of him, thought he'd save us some time on his rebuild by cutting the old spokes/rim off, not realising you can't rethread the new spokes until the freewheel is off. :facepalm:


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 3:02 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Fri May 18, 2012 11:24 am
Posts: 194
Location: London SW
mattr wrote:
ugo.santalucia wrote:
Then I'm afraid you won't be able to take that one off... I had a similar case... I have tried to clamp it to the bench vice, I have tried to bake it in the oven at 100 degrees and I even tried to freeze it in liquid nitrogen... I then ran out of ideas
I just laced it into an old rim we had in the shop, only half the spokes, in one direction (to take the load), not trued, tensioned or anything. It was a bit wobbly but came off ok.

Customer got the pi55 taken out of him, thought he'd save us some time on his rebuild by cutting the old spokes/rim off, not realising you can't rethread the new spokes until the freewheel is off. :facepalm:



I did think of doing that, but I assumed one side of the wheel was not enough for leverage... also, with large sprockets and a narrow flange (46 mm) on a Mavic 501 it was difficult even to route a spoke on the opposite side, given how tight the holes are...


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 3:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
Posts: 2367
Yeah, i can imagine it wouldn't work on all wheels! But as it was a rather expensive hub (and freewheel) it was worth the effort!


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 3:23 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2010 7:07 pm
Posts: 1321
Location: Cotswolds
There is a better method, if you attach spokes to the other hub flange then you will usually just twist the hub.
I used to cut the heads off and put a double bend on a few spokes so that they can be inserted behind the freewheel.


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