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 Post subject: Replacing my old wheels
PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:51 pm 
Newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:08 pm
Posts: 2
Hey Retrobike,

I've just joined your community, this place is awesome. I have something of a newbie question that hopefully you might be able to help me out with...

I recently bought a Raleigh road bike (late 70s/early 80s according to the seller), got a couple of weeks riding out of it before, alas, the rear axle snapped. My local bike shop told me I might have some trouble finding the replacement Imperial-sized parts (bearings as well, which have become evenly distributed across my garden), can anyone point me in the right direction for a supplier?

Alternatively - it sounds like it might save future hassle if I just change the whole rear wheel assembly with new metric parts, although I realise there might be problems with the brake pad alignment. Is his even possible?

Cheers!


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2013 11:08 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8246
Location: Cumbria
Pic and model name might help :D

Welcome :)

Shaun


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 3:50 pm 
Newbie

Joined: Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:08 pm
Posts: 2
Thanks!!

You make a good point. I have absolutely no idea what model it would be, but I do have an album of photos. Please excuse the pants in the background.

The serial number is NM0069264, which would indicate that the bike was manufactured in Nottingham, Sept 1976, but I haven't been able to turn up any other information.

Cheers, Mike


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 7:24 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8246
Location: Cumbria
Serial number is from 1980 if the third digit is a zero, it would have been a 6 for 1976 IIRC . I'll have a look at the albums later as my internet here in the sticks is being slooooooooooooooooooooooww :(

Shaun


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 7:12 pm 
rBoTM Winner
rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2012 10:18 pm
Posts: 2373
Location: California
Replacing that broken axle should not be an issue you just need to find a shop that works on old bikes. My LBS has hundreds of old axles in a drawer for just such an occurrence. Not that it will help you much being hlaf way round the globe, but there must be a shop near you that can help.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:51 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
rider | rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:42 pm
Posts: 5132
Location: Wakefield, Yorkshire
I think your LBS is talking out of their bottom. What do they mean by 'Imperial Parts'? If the bike is as recent as said above then it's fittings are relatively recent and many of them will be 'Metric' - if there is such a differentiation in bike parts. I am sure you will find everything you need to fix it relatively easily either here, at jumbles or on e-bay etc. I'm also sure that they will have (or should have!) bearings etc. to fit in their stocks. They probably just want to sell you a new bike!

What exactly do you require?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:08 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:54 am
Posts: 157
Location: Cambridge, UK
Hey there,

If it were me, I'd just buy a replacement 27 x 1 1/4 rear wheel on a well-known auction site, transfer the freewheel, tyre and tube over and keep riding. If you're anywhere near Cambridge then you're welcome to nip over and have a rootle through my collection of spare imperial wheels - I'm sure there's something that'd fit.

You could convert to metric if you want - here's what I wrote about the subject to another person facing the same conundrum as you:

Option 1: Buy 27" wheels (might as well buy alloy ones!)
Pros: Originality, brakes will still line up, like-for like swap so you can use your existing rim tape, freewheel, tubes and tyres
Cons: Old size, poor tyre choice

Option 2: Buy new 700c wheels with hub that accepts screw-on freewheel
Pros: Good tyre choice, wider choice of wheels
Cons: You might need to exchange your brake callipers, screw-on freewheel is old technology

Option 3: Buy new 700c wheels with freehub that accepts cassette and lock-ring
Pros: current technology, lots of choice in tyres and cassettes etc.
Cons: You might need to exchange your brake callipers

If you go with option 3 then bear in mind that there are two types of free-hub and the Shimano one will give you a choice of cheaper cassetttes...


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