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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 5:52 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:31 pm
Posts: 740
I have 1 Quando hub that won't let me remove the freehub. I believe its pressed on.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:21 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 8:08 pm
Posts: 55
Location: London
Thanks for the info. I think my hesitation with Quando is based on the way they arrive (needing grease and adjustment) and the odd sizing I experienced with one. Trying to find a 10mm extra-fine (for that is what it was) nut on eBay was difficult, despite there being many sellers of related hardware. It's just an odd size/thread. I must say modern cones and hubs don't seem as substantial as those I recall from my youth :-)

I've also got one Quando-hubbed wheel with a wonky freewheel mount (wobble) but then it may have fallen off a cliff before I received it - it came on a used bike. I may try and respoke the "Heliocomatic" wheel as it's unique and the rims are nice black Mavic. Although Sheldon Brown was not a fan - I'd just build it for practice and hang it up, I suspect.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 6:56 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:57 pm
Posts: 774
My experience is to the contrary - they're cheap junk and spares are almost impossible to obtain.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 7:22 pm 
Section Moderator & South West AEC
Section Moderator & South West AEC
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Joined: Mon Jun 25, 2007 3:33 pm
Posts: 8157
Location: new forest
i used to run a 200 bike hire fleet, most of the bikes had quando hubs on them, 8/9 speed. they weren't too bad generally but they were basic.

the issues i had were:-

when the freehub body dies, it's an absolute pain to find a replacement, but they are available, most common way to remove them is a massive allen key into the non drive side after removing the axle etc, i found the best way was to clamp the allen key in the vice then mount the wheel then use the rim for leverage, can't remember if it's a left handed thread though, it was ages ago.

other issue is they tend to use 2 ball bearing sizes, 1/4 in the non drive side and 7/32 in the drive side so this also means 2 different size cones if they need replacing.

shimano hubs are better by miles in my opinion, even the basic models, the freehubs/cones/bearings are also really easy to find and the bearings are the same size both sides of the hub.

:)


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:23 am 
r.B.o.T.M. & P.o.T.M. Winner
r.B.o.T.M. & P.o.T.M. Winner
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Joined: Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:41 pm
Posts: 2449
Location: Plymouth, UK
monty dog wrote:
My experience is to the contrary - they're cheap junk and spares are almost impossible to obtain.


Hell that means I have cheap junk on my bike. Utter piffle.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:37 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 8:08 pm
Posts: 55
Location: London
I don't have vast experience with them, but my opinion is sort of in the middle, in that they are good value for the money and with hard-to-find 27" wheels (with decent Chinese Weinmann hoops) going for as little as £25, they can certainly breath some new life into an old classic. I find that the first part to go cosmetically on many bikes is/was the spokes. And if you spend two hours cleaning them up, they rust again very quickly. Shimano (and let's be honest, they make some low-low end stuff, too) hubs seem to be about £20 more at least when built into a wheel. So, overall, I think it's good to have a choice - cheap Quandos to pretty something up, then better wheels if it becomes a regular ride. I would expect the fronts to last longer than the rears, of course.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 11:10 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 10:00 pm
Posts: 523
Location: Ely. UK
Joe of Loath wrote:
You have to use a spoke calculator. There are loads online, some have databases of hubs and rims. This is my favourite http://leonard.io/edd/

Seriously though, for the price of a new hub and new spokes (plus any labour) you'll be well over the price of a new wheel which has the same hub and spokes but a better rim. You can get a Shimano R500 for £50 or so.


+1 for this spoke length calculator.
I normally measure ERD, flange widths & center etc manually as well, just because I like doing it :-)
Always lace my own wheels these days for the same reason.


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