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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 3:25 pm 
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Old money, Old Ned? That advert must be pre-'70s. Judging by the contents it could be older than I am! When were Weinmann 500s introduced? I don't remember that QR. I'm fairly confident that some mid to late '70s 500s were without it. Later I think there was an ugly bulky plastic QR, which is the one that you wouldn't see on a TT bike.

I don't know what it was with Weinmann levers- They were 'bulbous', and the way they mounted to the bars always seemed less than confidence-inspiring compared to Campag, Mafac etc. I never had Universal. You can see plenty of 500 calipers in late '70s TT photos, but the levers are nearly always Campag., or indistinguishable from Campag. I guess there could have been an aspirational side to it also- like saying: "I use Weinmann 500 calipers because they are light, not because I cannot afford Campag- "

My first close-clearance combination was Weinmann 500 calipers (no QR) and Mafac 2000 levers, which were bulky compared to Campag, but not 'bulbous'.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 4:39 pm 
retrobike rider
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More brilliant information, thanks very much.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 6:46 pm 
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Certainly in the mid 70's Weinmann levers were considered "low rent" and I raced on 500's (which were the only things that would fit) with Shimano Dura-Ace drilled levers.

Much later as I was leaving the scene Weinmann sort of woke up and produced the Carrera Pro range (including rims as well I think) which had the QR on the brake and the levers were drilled and much better..........by then they had missed the boat LOL

There was talk of a "piccolo" set of campag brakes which were for very tight clearance frames but could have been an urban myth :)

Shaun


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 7:03 pm 
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Midlife wrote:
Certainly in the mid 70's Weinmann levers were considered "low rent" and I raced on 500's (which were the only things that would fit) with Shimano Dura-Ace drilled levers.

Much later as I was leaving the scene Weinmann sort of woke up and produced the Carrera Pro range (including rims as well I think) which had the QR on the brake and the levers were drilled and much better..........by then they had missed the boat LOL

There was talk of a "piccolo" set of campag brakes which were for very tight clearance frames but could have been an urban myth :)

Shaun


The Carrera levers were Campag copies like most brake levers of the time but possibly slightly larger to suit non-Italian man-sized hands. Piccolo stirrups did exist, Whiskers (amongst others) advertised them regularly in 'Cycling'. I think that the early DA levers were very 'Weinmann'ish' in their design - the rubber hoods are certainly interchangeable.

The Ted Gerrard ad is 1957 but I had the QR's a lot later than this. The 1970 Holdsworth 'Aids' catalogue shows them fitted with QR - but by then Weinmann had introduced the brake lever with the 'pull out tab' QR.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 7:08 pm 
retrobike rider
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Midlife wrote:
Certainly in the mid 70's Weinmann levers were considered "low rent" and I raced on 500's (which were the only things that would fit) with Shimano Dura-Ace drilled levers.

Much later as I was leaving the scene Weinmann sort of woke up and produced the Carrera Pro range (including rims as well I think) which had the QR on the brake and the levers were drilled and much better..........by then they had missed the boat LOL

There was talk of a "piccolo" set of campag brakes which were for very tight clearance frames but could have been an urban myth :)

Shaun


This forum is a gold mine....

Talking of rims :roll:

I should have a pair of Campag 36 hole hubs on their way to me this week, so I am now on the lookout for some age related rims. To make life more difficult, I'd prefer to go clincher, just for ease of repair in the event of a puncture.

Any suggestions of make and model?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 7:20 pm 
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The only "clinchers" around at the time were Michelin Elan TS.......... the first folding tyre in a box LOL Matching rims from Mavic (Module E)

Never trusted them LOL

Mavic MA2's look pretty retro :)

Shaun


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 7:23 pm 
retrobike rider
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Midlife wrote:
Mavic MA2's look pretty retro :)


Yes I thought so.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 8:33 pm 
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Module Es are "five-yard sprints".. i.e. at five yards you....can see the rest of this sentence coming.. :| I don't remember the original Michelin Elans as being folding?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 10:41 pm 
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True, the original Elan's didn't fold but the "MKII version" the TS did, still unimpressed and would rather ride on a 14 oz Wolber stuck on a Fiamme rim. Some used them on their winter bikes....typical Northern Cheapskates :D

The original Module E's were a bit hit and miss quality wise, in fact the 70's Mavic rims were a bit rough sometimes. Theory goes that they bought out Superchampion who taught them how to build rims properly :)

I never seem to see many Module E's about, Murphy's law that an e-bay search will throw up hundreds for sale LOL

Shaun


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 8:16 am 
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Location: Sheffield, top city
weinmann rims were best. Bit heavy, bit wide, but bombproof. I sometimes wish the weinman concave was still made for a commuter bike in the pot hole riddled holes of sheffield.


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