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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 9:41 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:22 pm
Posts: 1994
Location: North Ayrshire
any ideas on how to get the bugger out?!

Image

Image

:evil:


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 9:50 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 2:38 pm
Posts: 302
Location: West Dorset
Now I don't believe you wanted to do that!

Do you have an engineering firm near you with a spark erosion equipment? Removing hardened steel from lovely soft mild steel is tricky at the best of times so better leave it to the professionals IMHO.

Martin


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 11:40 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:22 pm
Posts: 1994
Location: North Ayrshire
that's interesting martin as my engineering chum also recommended
this technique. unfortunately my timing is a bit crap as he
has just LEFT the company that had that equipment!

:(


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 2013 11:58 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Ah, that is pretty poor planning! Did he leave under a cloud or would he still be able to get it sorted for you or at least point you in the direction of an ex colleague who would sort it in his lunch hour for a beer or three?

Martin


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 12:56 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:22 pm
Posts: 1994
Location: North Ayrshire
good thinking, batman! will give him a shout and see what he says.
was also thinking as an alternative, if there is perhaps something
that i could sit in the dropout to stop the wheel pulling to one side?
remember those plastic frame packers you used to get with a new
frame to stop the back end getting crushed in transit...? hmm...


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:45 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
Posts: 8247
Location: Cumbria
Remove the other dropout screw, the wheel will sit a bit further back but should be ridable :). Shaun from iPhone


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 8:00 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 10:35 pm
Posts: 8423
Location: The desolate flats of Cambridgeshire
Yup spark erosion is really the only way that is being removed, and even then you may just find it cheaper to cut out and get a new drop out welded in.

Small diameter taps are a nightmare and require absolute concentration and accuracy other wise they fail. Horrible things.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 4:27 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:10 pm
Posts: 669
Can't see from the photo, but presumably if this is a tap it has some longitudinal grooves in it for clearing swarf. Occurs to me that if you can locate the broken ends of them you may be able to improvise a tool with which to apply leverage .. a small, tough, two-short-pronged tool? Re-shaped screwdriver bit or something? If it's a tapered tap, you may have a better chance than if it's a straight one. A long-shot, and a labour-intensive one, but fairly risk-free...if it don't work then it don't work. Just an idea..I'm not an engineer and have no idea what 'spark erosion' is.. take it for what it's worth. Good luck!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 6:49 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 3:44 pm
Posts: 422
Location: at my computer
This is a cautionary tale about always using sufficient lubrication and not using cheap taps. I have been able to remove a few taps like this for friends who have done what you did by using a cutting wheel on a dremel and cutting a screw driver slot in the end of the broken tap if visible.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 6:57 pm 
Concours Judge
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Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2005 3:59 pm
Posts: 8171
Location: a proper EU country
I ride some frames without dropouts screws. The only consequence is that I am a tiny bit longer busy getting the wheel in the correct position after I have taken it out.


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