Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sun Sep 25, 2016 1:18 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 63 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:25 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6742
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
Last night I finished Slaying the Badger by Richard Moore.

This tells the story of the 1986 Tour de France and the battle between Bernard Hinault and Greg Lemond.

As a newbie roadie I know nothing about the TdF before 2011, other that what I have read over the last few months, so I did not know the outcome of the battle, which only added to the excitement. The fact that Richard Moore intersperses incidents at the time with recent conversation really makes this a film documentary of a book.

One of the best books I have read so far, and an excellent insight into the minds of the protagonists and those around them.

Oh, and Bernard Hinault is one tough cookie.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2013 4:11 pm 
MacModerator
MacModerator
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:59 pm
Posts: 20749
Location: Sol Kitts
Mountain High: Europe's 50 Greatest Cycle Climbs

Image

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mountain-High-E ... 304&sr=8-1


This is a really really nice coffee tablesque book, some lovely shots and is great as a dream ride planner :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:16 am 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6742
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
The Srampagmano Tales - by Scarlett Parker.

I was given this as a gift for my birthday; I had seen mention of it on the net, but not taken too much notice.

Obviously based on The Canterbury Tales (which I have not read), I did not really know what to expect, but what I was not expecting, was a series of stories told in rhyming couplets.

It's a very quick and entertaining read that must have taken the author hundreds of brain boiling hours to write.

A very cool little book, and one I'm delighted to own.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:30 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
Posts: 3798
Location: Staffordshire
In Pursuit of Glory, by Bradley Wiggins.

Not a bad page turner at all. He is a better rider than writer though. Found at least three glaring grammar errors. I really enjoyed reading his technical breakdown of the 4000m team pursuit. These guys really are phenomenal athletes. I wonder how it will be edited to reflect LA's fall from grace?

I would read it again!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2013 2:38 pm 
MacRetro Deputy AEC
MacRetro Deputy AEC
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2010 11:03 pm
Posts: 1981
Location: Lanarkshire, Bonnie Scotchland
The Flying Scotsman: The Graeme Obree Story

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Flying-Scotsman-Graeme-Obree-Story/dp/1841583359/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1360589376&sr=1-1

interesting read, as much about personal challenges as it is about professional. he achieved a lot more than I remembered for bitd, wonder what he could if achieved with a little more support, akin to the current era


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:58 pm 
MacModerator
MacModerator
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:59 pm
Posts: 20749
Location: Sol Kitts
Fallen Angel: The passion of Fausto Coppi.

Image

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0224074504/r ... 0224074504


Brilliant book in every way, really well written and insightful. More than just a log of events but a real study of Coppi, Bartali and Italy of the time, you get a real sense of how important cycling was and still is to Italians. Recommended *****.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2013 8:25 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6742
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
I'm currently up to Chapter 5 of Cycling Past 50 by Joe Friel. I'll do a full review when I get to the end, but once you get to Chapter 3, it really turns into a very sensibly laid out training book, for those of us approaching, at, or past the half way mark.

The reason for this post is a bit cheeky, as for reasons we will not go into, other than to say two people had the same idea for a birthday present, I have two copies of this book.

If anyone has a cycling book that they would like to swop for a brand new copy of Cycling past 50, then I would be happy to do a trade.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:53 am 
Dirt Disciple
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2012 12:48 pm
Posts: 31
Location: South East UK
The Cycling past 50 book is good, but the well laid out training regimes that you talk about seem to be what you could find in any training book. It's the rest of the content, in my view, is what is relevant to the books title. Never the less an interesting read.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 24, 2013 4:36 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6742
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
I don't know how Cycling past 50 compares to other training manuals, as I don't have any.

One aspect I did find a little annoying is the reference to lactate threashold heart rate, with all references to training based on percentages of this figure. I have no easy way of working out my LTHR, and so I found an equivalent chart on line, based on max heart rate, which for me is a much better figure.

As stated, from Chapter 7 onwards, the book is really very relevant to the older rider, and I am finding it particularly useful for working out my future training schedule and workrates, as well as what I can and should be snacking on before, during and after my rides.

This is a very quick read and I am finding it an incredibly useful training book, based on the fact that I am new to road riding and over 50.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2013 10:12 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:08 am
Posts: 6742
Location: Nth Somerset, UK
I've just finished ' A Dog In A Hat' by Joe Parkin.

This is an extremely lively and readable book about the working life of a team cyclist, what is different is that this cyclist is a young American who has decided to make it big in Europe.

A super little book, well written and easy to read because of the format of telling bite sized stories.

Parkin is a very honest writer, and slips a few barbs into the book, regarding teams, drugs, other riders and the UCI.

Next up is his second book Come & Gone.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 63 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Oldbikefan and 20 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group