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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 6:39 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 5:17 pm
Posts: 3775
Location: Norn Iron
I would not like to say - as i am not sure, no doubt there is someone who will provide the answer. I suspect they will work but wait for confirmation by a knowledgeable member.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:01 pm 
Road Moderator
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Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 1:07 pm
Posts: 4715
Location: Sheppey, Kent
Yup pretty universal you just need one of these:

Image

To get a straight replacement ie another Huret one should not cost you much, prob no more than £10. You could take the opportunity to upgrade now to something better it's upto you. Used prices are say from £10 - £lot's. Please don't slap on a modern generic one though as you'll ruin the aesthetics of the bike ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:05 pm 
Road Moderator
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Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 1:07 pm
Posts: 4715
Location: Sheppey, Kent
Hanger: http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... nger-plate


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 7:51 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:42 am
Posts: 345
Location: Birmingham
Not mine - Sachs Huret Eco Rear Derailleur - £7.00.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2012 8:01 pm 
Road Moderator
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Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2009 1:07 pm
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Location: Sheppey, Kent
If you're lucky you'll be able to unbolt your knackered mech from it's hanger and save yourself £5....


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 10:52 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 10:30 pm
Posts: 20
As it turns out a friend of mine has a direct replacement I am can have!

One last question - is it possible to get any kind of hood on these weinmann brakes? Would tidy it up a bit If anything would fit


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:25 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 10:30 pm
Posts: 20
By 'hood' I mean a flexible cover that can go over the brake to hide the edges of the bar tape around the brake levers


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:07 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2012 10:30 pm
Posts: 20
Hey guys, been having a wiked time on this bike, only thing im thinking of doing now is upgrading the wheels as they are a bit out of shape. Im not terribly fussed about lightness or anything i just want something that is going to be tough as i regularly do stupid things like ride my bike down stairs etc :D

Will probably get a second hand set on ebay but i dont know what i should be looking for? my bikes 12 speed so is there anything in particular i should look for or can you swap gears onto the back wheel easily enough?

Any makes that are known for being tough?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:17 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:39 pm
Posts: 35
Location: argyll
thats the wrong sort of bike for stairs, maybe swap it for a mountain bike, they have tougher wheels. otherwise , dont kerb it and learn how to keep your wheels true with a spoke key.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:20 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2012 11:09 pm
Posts: 33
Probably just as easy to get the originals straightened - certainly cheaper. My chap charges me £12 a rim for full service/tighten/etc. Where do you live?

Replacement wheels - modern stuff will often have a wider rear spindle/axle, which will mean cold-setting the rear forks to fit (bending it using a bit of wood basically, surprisingly easy to do).

Then there's the potential problem of cassette type rear cogs - most, if not all, modern 700c road wheels will be cassette type hub, whereas the Dawes may have screw-on type hub. The difference being is the rear cogs slide on, and are then held in place on the hub by a collar, whereas the screw on type screw the hub face. - tricky to explain without photos.

If you're going to ride a roadie down stairs, just get the steelies straightened and then stick with them. They'll warp easier than alloy rims, but you'll get far more corrections out of steel than aluminium.


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