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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:58 pm 
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Quote:
Fingers crossed I don't have to go those levels!


The worst-case scenario hasn't even been mentioned yet...Good luck! :)


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:14 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Location: Mansfield Woodhouse, Nott's.
torqueless wrote:
Quote:
Fingers crossed I don't have to go those levels!

The worst-case scenario hasn't even been mentioned yet...Good luck! :)

1: Snapping the pegs off the tool!
2: Pegs slipping out the recess's!
3: Tool and block ruined making wheel buggered!

These can all be avoided if done correctly and that the tool is a mint fit into the block.

**Make sure the peg recess's are cleaned out before fitting the tool**


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 11:10 pm 
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I'm reporting you lot for scare-mongering ;-)


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 11:43 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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al-onestare wrote:
I'm reporting you lot for scare-mongering ;-)


If the pegs snap off the tool or the block recesses get damaged and rounded then, if the wheel is worth saving, it's time to scrap the block altogether. Get a punch/drift and undo the face plate using the 2 dimples in the plate (opposite thread to remove), pull the outer block and sprockets off the body, remove the small wire that acts as a pawl spring and remove the 2 pawls. This will leave 2 recesses opposite each other where the pawls sit. These recesses act as 'flats' that can be clamped tight in a vice, or, if you have one like me, a 36" stilson pipe wrench does the job.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 10:38 am 
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Image
Ouch! :x Exhibit B, :oops:
I don't think the design of this particular block was giving me much support. Doubtless there was a dedicated removal tool for it which I should have used instead of the generic 2-prong one pictured. IIRC I got it loose without going through the whole thing described by originalshinkicker. If you do have to go through that, the block is still salvageable/rebuildable BTW, if you think worthwhile.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 10:41 am 
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Couple of things, it's a Suntour cassette so got the right tool. That previous shot differs from what I have as the centre piece and locking bit is recessed, so fingers crossed I don't have the same problems.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 11:22 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 4:31 pm
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If you have just 2 slots you can bodge with a piece of bar that fits exactly in a vice. Being long it doesn't matter if the freewheel slides as long as it stays pushed down. There will me , as mentioned, much more leverage by moving the wheel.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 2:11 pm 
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Quote:
If you have just 2 slots you can bodge with a piece of bar that fits exactly in a vice. Being long it doesn't matter if the freewheel slides as long as it stays pushed down.


yeah I can see that would have worked on my freewheel, with it's slots standing proud of the lockring. Probably not on a-lonestare's though.
,
Quote:
locking bit is recessed

Quote:
Suntour cassette so got the right tool.

Confucius say: "Wise man when buying freewheel also buys dedicated removal tool, sparing himself much vexation" :)

Every time I've screwed a block to a hub I've wished I had one of those very thin spacer-ring things to put on first, but never have had one at hand. I think I had a couple from a bike shop years ago-god knows what happened to them. In these 'cassette' days I don't even know how to ask for such a thing.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 3:38 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Location: Mansfield Woodhouse, Nott's.
I can see exactly why your pegs jumped out the recess's of the freewheel! The pegs are too deep
on the tool and should have been ground down slightly so the pegs and the steel face sat right
up against the block, This slight mod' would have stopped the tool from rocking about whilst trying to unscrew the block.

torqueless wrote:
Image
.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 8:36 pm 
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Thanks.. yeah I see what you mean. My lame excuse is that I was probably saving those prongs for the next freewheel removal, during which I would be glad I hadn't ground them down. False economy.. :roll: :oops: (makes mental note to check how tool mates with other freewheel, and grind down tool if necessary) :)


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