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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:15 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
Posts: 3798
Location: Staffordshire
You are supposed to use the power in you legs to slow the back wheel and therefore act as the rear brake. Fixed gears do take some getting used to as you can't freewheel etc.

Once you get used to oil tanker style stopping distances though it does make a refreshing if not knackering change.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:32 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:02 am
Posts: 8
Location: East Midlands
Iwasgoodonce wrote:
You are supposed to use the power in your legs to slow the back wheel and therefore act as the rear brake. Fixed gears do take some getting used to as you can't freewheel etc.

Once you get used to oil tanker style stopping distances though it does make a refreshing if not knackering change.


power in your legs - that'll be me out then! And no freewheeling - that's the only thing that makes cycling any fun!


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:13 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 12:31 am
Posts: 585
Location: London
I'm a bit dubious why his frames go for such a high price, for an old secondhand frame that is, it's still no more than an equivalent new frame. Maybe it's a combination of being easily identifiable and the usual thing of once something gets known as "collectible" the price gets inflated by speculators and people buying thinking more of the re-sale value than the thing in itself.

Iwasgoodonce wrote:
You are supposed to use the power in you legs to slow the back wheel and therefore act as the rear brake. Fixed gears do take some getting used to as you can't freewheel etc.

Once you get used to oil tanker style stopping distances though it does make a refreshing if not knackering change.


Err...you use the front brake.

Fixed wheel just mean you can't freewheel, that's it.

Backwards pressure on the pedals is useful for minor speed adjustments, but you don't have use it for stopping and slowing down, that's what the front brake is for.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:16 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
Posts: 3798
Location: Staffordshire
fiks wrote:
I'm a bit dubious why his frames go for such a high price, for an old secondhand frame that is, it's still no more than an equivalent new frame. Maybe it's a combination of being easily identifiable and the usual thing of once something gets known as "collectible" the price gets inflated by speculators and people buying thinking more of the re-sale value than the thing in itself.

Iwasgoodonce wrote:
You are supposed to use the power in you legs to slow the back wheel and therefore act as the rear brake. Fixed gears do take some getting used to as you can't freewheel etc.

Once you get used to oil tanker style stopping distances though it does make a refreshing if not knackering change.


Err...you use the front brake.

Fixed wheel just mean you can't freewheel, that's it.

Backwards pressure on the pedals is useful for minor speed adjustments, but you don't have use it for stopping and slowing down, that's what the front brake is for.


Err...Yes pretty obvious. The OP mentioned the front brake and was questioning the lack of the rear brake.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:45 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2012 11:12 pm
Posts: 200
Location: Herts/Essex border
High price ? Have you looked recently at what a new handbuilt quality steel frame will cost you ? Yes they are collectible as anything is that is known to be well made and is no longer available. Just filing the lugs took LE hours of work.

I am pleased that "Mum" has decided to keep the bike in the family. It would be appropriate if your son/daughter carried on the family tradition and completed the restoration. Do your research and then find a frame restorer local to you with whom you can work. You need to keep control over what they do.

The bike is a fixed wheel with what are called track ends as this type of frame was used for racing on the track of a velodrome and was also used in the past for racing in time trials on the road before gear systems became widely used. For pleasure use you can change the cog on the back to a single speed freewheel so you can freewheel after all. Any decent bike shop ought to be able to do this for you. Just don't think about fitting gears to it.

Let us know how you get on with it and come back if you need further advice.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 4:49 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 12:31 am
Posts: 585
Location: London
Iwasgoodonce wrote:
fiks wrote:
I'm a bit dubious why his frames go for such a high price, for an old secondhand frame that is, it's still no more than an equivalent new frame. Maybe it's a combination of being easily identifiable and the usual thing of once something gets known as "collectible" the price gets inflated by speculators and people buying thinking more of the re-sale value than the thing in itself.

Iwasgoodonce wrote:
You are supposed to use the power in you legs to slow the back wheel and therefore act as the rear brake. Fixed gears do take some getting used to as you can't freewheel etc.

Once you get used to oil tanker style stopping distances though it does make a refreshing if not knackering change.


Err...you use the front brake.

Fixed wheel just mean you can't freewheel, that's it.

Backwards pressure on the pedals is useful for minor speed adjustments, but you don't have use it for stopping and slowing down, that's what the front brake is for.


Err...Yes pretty obvious. The OP mentioned the front brake and was questioning the lack of the rear brake.


Oh, I misread your message a bit, I think we're saying the same thing.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 5:10 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:10 pm
Posts: 668
Quote:
you can change the cog on the back to a single speed freewheel so you can freewheel after all.


That's what I was about to say, with the caveat that doing so may make a back brake necessary, which would mean drilling a hole in that seatstay bridge? :shock: :cry:


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