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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:18 pm 
retrobike rider
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Go back......................back to the future! :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:22 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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So, do they tend to puncture less than clinchers? Once the hedge cutting season is past, I think I'm going to give them a go.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:39 pm 
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another one of a certain age who only rode on sew-ups as high pressure clinchers weren't available back then. Wonderful ride but expensive as they puncture easily and are very time-consuming to repair. Nice to have a tubular wheelset for special occasions but clinchers are more practical.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:44 pm 
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Iwasgoodonce wrote:
So, do they tend to puncture less than clinchers? Once the hedge cutting season is past, I think I'm going to give them a go.


I don't think so, unless you're getting snake-bite punctures on your clinchers from pinching the inner tube when fitting it, running the pressure too low, and/or braking excessively on descents. Tubs puncture more easily than good, properly installed clinchers. Anyone who claims otherwise is talking nonsense.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 10:20 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Location: Wiltshire, UK
I run my classic fleet on tubs - and I only used tubs back in the 80s although decent clinchers (or HPs as they were known back then) were becoming available.

I use Vittoria Rallys - in 21mm and 23mm and have found them to be generally excellent for £15 each (I bought some from Parker International this week). They have natural side walls, so good for vclassic bikes, as do Continental Giros - I have a couple but I've not used them yet so can't comment on their performance vs the Rallys.

Just one issue to report in the last 3 years - a puncture after 50 meters on a brand new tyre - I live on a gravelly single track lane.

At £15, unless you're inclined to repair them yourself, they are throw away as (last time I checked) it would cost more than that to have an expert make the repair. It might be worth repairing more expensive tubs.

I nearly always use glue - the bigger `pot' from Continental as it contains a brush - I can't really get used to rim tape - might just be lack of practice though!

By coincidence I was watching the Continental You Tube instructional video today - their recommended process for mating tyre and rim spans several days!

Mine does not and I've never had a tub part from a rim.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 10:24 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
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just ordered some Vittoria rallys . it was a choice between them and the conti , but went for amberwall .


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 11:01 pm 
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"Tubs puncture more easily than good, properly installed clinchers. Anyone who claims otherwise is talking nonsense."
I disagree. Discounting compression puntures which I feel tubs deal with better I have still had less punctures with tubs than clinchers. There is no reason to say so. The same maybe be but as my tubs were always cheapies or second hand ones whereas my clinchers are decent ones it could be that there is my answer.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 11:07 pm 
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Location: Cumbria
I've used them all at one time or another, from 27 X 1/14 HP on the original early 70's carlton, cheap sprints and tubs, more expensive sprints and tubs, Medale D'or 28 spoke, Michelin elan to the clinchers on my Basso.........

And the thing that gets me is when you pick up a wheel and spin it.....the old sprints and tubs spin so much better :)

It's just my opinion but as time has gone on the number of spokes has reduced, the rim has had to become more aero and rigid and so heavier.

Great for TT work when you get rolling and are worried about drag but heavy aero rims and spokes do nothing for the average rider.

36 hole Fiamme rims on cheap Suzue hubs really do ride well :)

Shaun


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 8:45 am 
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mattsccm wrote:
"Tubs puncture more easily than good, properly installed clinchers. Anyone who claims otherwise is talking nonsense."
I disagree. Discounting compression puntures which I feel tubs deal with better I have still had less punctures with tubs than clinchers. There is no reason to say so. The same maybe be but as my tubs were always cheapies or second hand ones whereas my clinchers are decent ones it could be that there is my answer.


Not sure I follow you on that one. :lol:

I should qualify this slightly as I wasn't thinking of like for like exactly. Most tubs don't have any real puncture protection. Not surprisingly, they puncture quite easily.

Where I agree with you is that a blow-out on a tub is safer than a blow-out on a clincher, especially if it's the front tyre, but you shouldn't get a blow-out on a front clincher if it's been fit properly, the tyre is in good condition, and you don't drag on the brakes on long descents.

I haven't tried them, but tubeless tyres on the new-ish wider tubeless rims seem to have both the ride advantage of old-fashioned tubs and the puncture protection of the best clinchers. Or so I hear from friends in the States who ride them. But it may just be they've been taken in by the marketing tosh. I suspect they've never actually ridden on tubs to begin with. :roll:


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 9:08 am 
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Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 6:31 pm
Posts: 1112
My biggest problem with tubulars is that I've had persistent problems with the base tape peeling away at the sides of the tube after they are installed.
This has happened on a couple of brand new Vittoria Rally tubulars.

Does anyone know if I'm doing anything wrong that might be causing this?
Is it down to bad installation technique, excessive braking, road conditions,
badly made tubulars, or what?

I'd be grateful for any suggestions because apart from this problem, I have grown to quite like tubulars. They are a bit more comfortable than clinchers, I've not had major problems with punctures, and they look good (apart from the peeling base tape :x)


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