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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:41 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
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Location: Staffordshire
Midlife wrote:
Best not to "trial" a new stem and put fresh bar tape on in case you need to swap the stem again.........assuming it's a Cinnelli type quill stem. I might have something in the garage that's shorter?


Shaun


That's exactly what I'm after Shaun. A newb has kindly PMed me with an offer last night. However, what have you got as the fixed (currently armed with a 155mm stem) could also do with a change. Oh how youth is wasted on the young!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:42 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2012 7:08 pm
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Location: London
I have a couple of 70 or 80 mm quill stems, that aren't being put to much use here, maybe they'll be too short, but if you're interested drop me a PM.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2012 10:53 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Location: Cumbria
Just had a look in the garage and the only one I have is a 60mm Sakae Royal which isn't much use, sorry :(

Youth is certainly wasted on the young.........being born in the 50's is a killer on the legs and lungs LOL

Strangely, I once applied for a job to work in the UK with strong China links but at my age I was considered too young :)

What's the track frame ? Just curious :D

Shaun


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 8:24 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Location: Staffordshire
Midlife wrote:
Just had a look in the garage and the only one I have is a 60mm Sakae Royal which isn't much use, sorry :(

Youth is certainly wasted on the young.........being born in the 50's is a killer on the legs and lungs LOL

Strangely, I once applied for a job to work in the UK with strong China links but at my age I was considered too young :)

What's the track frame ? Just curious :D

Shaun


This one. Not a true track frame but built as a fixed by Mike Kowal. There's even a shot of the stem!


Attachments:
SS Side.JPG
SS Side.JPG [ 260.57 KiB | Viewed 300 times ]
SS Stem.JPG
SS Stem.JPG [ 277.26 KiB | Viewed 300 times ]
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:01 am 
rider | rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:42 pm
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Location: Wakefield, Yorkshire
Now that might be one of your problems - your saddle is pointing down slightly. Puts unecessary weight on the arms which isn't wanted. Try levelling it off.

And are those double groove bars? If so, fill the grooves (especially the outer one) with a length of outer cable under the tape. This helps to 'thicken' the bar around the top bend where it is at its thinnest. I used to have a problem with hand numbness on my winter bike with double groove bars until I did this which seems to have solved it.

Personally I don't hold with the 'fingers touching the bars' reach method. I reckon it's a bit to short for me, I like 3-4 fingers width between the finger tips and bar. Not very scientific I know - but it works for me - but not necessarily for anyone else.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:08 am 
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Location: Staffordshire
I limit rides on that one to around 25 miles. Any more and my knees explode! It is very odd getting back on the geared bike after a few rides on the fixed. As you start to freewheel, your brain screams, "Noooo!" and your body tenses for the coming crash.

On my timed 20 miler, the fixed doesn't seem any slower as it seems quicker on the flats/long steady up hills you get around here.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 10:40 pm 
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Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 11:24 am
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Location: London
Just some thoughts
I too am ape shaped. 5 11 with a reach of 6' 4'' and inside leg of 30''

Having ignored a similar problem to yours for several years, it just built up and 5 years ago I was actually off the bike for a year as the pain was too much.

I actually found that my own problem was only partially due to poor position reach- wise. It was mainly due to a basic physical issue that many of us humans have, which is poor leg alignment. When cycling and walking for 50 years on this planet, a small mis- alignment all adds up to a whole load of out of balance muscles and joints .

However having seen a couple of enlightened physios and also getting a bike and shoe fitting (yes even for walking) I now ride pain free most of the time. I may even race again next year !

It wasn't a one hit cure, and took about 4 years, but I can aim you at the professionals who helped me if you like !

Terry


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:56 pm 
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Location: Suffolk, UK
Iwasgoodonce wrote:
I'm old. Also, never having been properly fitted on a bike beyond the builder saying I needed a long top tube I think I need to revisit my position.

I did 70 miles yesterday and towards the end of the ride my neck was hurting. It was quite a noticable 'hurt' as I could feel it above the whole multitude of other hurts I was experiencing at the time.

A shorter stem would help? As the bike needs to go into the LBS to have new bar tape fitted, (I know, but I just can't do it) I figure now is a good time to look at the stem situation.

We are talking quill stems here by the way. On the geared bike, which is the one to be changed, stem length is 135mm centre to centre. The fixed stem is 150mm but has a shorter top tube.

How much should I bee looking at taking off? Or, should I man up? Cipollini would never reduce his after all!


Ever thought about going for a proper fit session. In all my years as a recreational rider, it really is one of the best investments I've ever made.
(apart from taking up yoga... the perfect compliment to this cycling lark - no laughing now folks)


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 8:30 am 
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The other obvious factor is fitness. If the 70 mile ride was more than you're used to, well it's normal you're going to have some aches and pains. But as others have said, your setup sounds pretty stretched out. Another tweak is raising the stem. This effectively shortens it at the same time by moving it closer inwards. The more upright riding position is also naturally more comfortable for riders who've lost some of their youthful flexibility. Doesn't look cool but can make a big difference in comfort.

This advice from Jim Langley also seems sensible:

A proper reach to the handlebars is the key to enjoying comfortable rides. If the bars are too close or too far away, you may experience neck, shoulder, back and hand pain. And, it can cause you to scoot backward or forward on your seat all the time. On most bikes, to change length, you must replace the stem. And stems come in a variety of types and diameters.
To check reach at home, put on your cycling clothes, mount your bike on a trainer and make sure the bike is level. Get on and pedal until you’re comfortable with your upper body relaxed. Look ahead as if you were looking down the road. For dropped handlebars, rest your hands on the tops of the brake levers. For flat bars with bar ends, use the regular grip position. Now, have a helper look at you from the side to gauge where a plumbline dropped from the tip of your nose would fall. Optimally, there should be about an inch between the plumb line and the center of the handlebar.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2012 1:42 pm 
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You should lie horizontally across your bike, face down with your eyes perfectly centered over the rear hub; you will find the nose of the saddle should be nestled in between your rib cage, approximately 80% aft of your lowest ribs. Next (with your legs straight) you will need to rotate your knees outwards, simultaneously, until the outside of your knees are almost flat on the hoods. Once you have achieved this you should place your arms down either side of the bike, until you can fit your hands (clasped) around your bottom bracket shell. At this point you will need a friend, with a straight rule, to measure between your third knuckle (counting backwards from your thumbs) and your outstretched toes. In order for your bike to be aligned correctly this measurement should be 137.5 - 139 cm, if it is anything more or less than this you will need to begin to make micro adjustments until the measurement falls to within this range.


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