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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 1:15 pm 
rBoTM Winner
rBoTM Winner

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 3:44 pm
Posts: 422
Location: at my computer
Here are two older photos of my forebears. The one is of my great-great grandmother being transported by wicker tricycle in about 1920. The other is of my great grandmother and her brother in 1896 in front of their house.


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over-oud-oma v. Leeuwen & Annemie 1920.jpg
over-oud-oma v. Leeuwen & Annemie 1920.jpg [ 432.27 KiB | Viewed 348 times ]
Paula & Jan v.Leeuwen 1896.jpg
Paula & Jan v.Leeuwen 1896.jpg [ 444.48 KiB | Viewed 348 times ]


Last edited by Citoyen du monde on Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:01 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Fri Sep 02, 2011 5:41 pm
Posts: 119
Location: Taunton, somerset
No photos but my grandmother did a couple of time trials in 1948 ish. I only beat her ten mile time last year as well :)
I think it was her brother that did grass track racing around that time. He won quite a few of the local club awards for it.

On a side note, if anyone has a 1948ish claud butler fixed wheel frame or bike they're looking to get rid of, give me a shout. I'll put a wanted ad up as well but thought I'd ask while we're on the subject.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 8:02 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2012 9:28 pm
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Location: Mansfield Woodhouse, Nott's.
Wouldn't it have been great to find these bikes again and put them back in the family were they belong.

Very doubtful though as most were destroyed for steel during WWII :(


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 1:07 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 3:44 pm
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Location: at my computer
I think that it should be pointed out that at the time of the OP's photo, riding a bike was exclusively a pastime of the wealthy and the relative cost of a bike was well beyond the reach of your average person. By the 20's, the price had dropped considerably and came within the reach of a far larger portion of the population. By the late 30's it had become quite commonplace and the wealthy had almost exclusively left the sport and moved on to automobiles and other pursuits, leving the sport of cycling as a more general pursuit. It is quite funny how it is now once again beginning to attract people as a somewhat exclusive sport, with many wealthy people eschewing sports like golf for the high-end of cycling.


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 Post subject: Early Bicycles.
PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2012 5:11 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2010 4:38 pm
Posts: 1468
Location: The Lovely Lincolnshire Wolds and by the sea in Sussex
Citoyen du monde wrote:
I think that it should be pointed out that at the time of the OP's photo, riding a bike was exclusively a pastime of the wealthy and the relative cost of a bike was well beyond the reach of your average person. By the 20's, the price had dropped considerably and came within the reach of a far larger portion of the population. By the late 30's it had become quite commonplace and the wealthy had almost exclusively left the sport and moved on to automobiles and other pursuits, leving the sport of cycling as a more general pursuit. It is quite funny how it is now once again beginning to attract people as a somewhat exclusive sport, with many wealthy people eschewing sports like golf for the high-end of cycling.


I would like to think, Cdm, that many, certainly the more knowledgeable RetroBikers would be aware of this most basic aspect of cycling history; I for one do - being the OP.
Typical, and well known early adopters of the bicycle were Edward Elgar the composer (who famously rode a Humber) and George Bernard Shaw (the playwright and author), as well as members of the Royal Family and the upper middle classes in general. These early bicycles were as expensive then as a decent car is today.
My own family were also early adopters of the automobile; having bought the first one before the Great War, and during the 20s and 30s owned such makes as Marmon, Packard and Mercedes - in fact my Grandfather had to hide his black Mercedes away upon the outbreak of WW2, and bought a six light Austin Ascot for his wartime motoring.
The earliest bicycle I have in my own collection is a Centaur Featherweight which dates from around 1906 - see this link for one like it.
http://www.oldbike.eu/museum/1906-centa ... -roadster/
Take the mobile phone as a parallel example, the first I ever had was £2500.00: if they were that price today how many people would own one?
Roadking.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:48 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 10:34 pm
Posts: 1513
You start the topic with '.....fun question', then proceed to turn it into a 'see how high you can p**s' competition.....!
Cdm was only trying to be informative and helpful.

I don't normally criticise other people's posts, whether I agree with them or not, but i found your remarks on both this post, and the curly hetchins topic, a bit condescending, to be honest.......


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 8:21 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Nov 24, 2010 4:38 pm
Posts: 1468
Location: The Lovely Lincolnshire Wolds and by the sea in Sussex
We're all entitled to an opinion; and I don't agree with yours (either of them).

This thread was supposed to be a"fun"one, and Cdm's original post was fine. However his second was condescending, we did not want a history lesson, however simplistic, and my reply was to make a point about how many things always change over time.

How you view my Hetchins post is beyond me, it is certainly not condescending - you may say it is, but it doesn't mean that's the case.

Roadking.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 7:45 pm 
Newbie

Joined: Mon Jun 04, 2012 2:22 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Gillingham, UK
Dad since 1948 and still riding. We still have the 1937 Stephens that was already vintage when he bought it and raced on it in the early 50's


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