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 Post subject: converting to fixed
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 10:09 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2007 1:29 pm
Posts: 35
Location: East Yorkshire
I have an old raleigh (80's I think) with reynolds 501 tubing in the garage and would like to convert it to a fixie as it has the old style sliding drop outs. Now i'm on a bit of a budget but have some idea of what I'm talking about as I own a on one il pompino.

Now here's the technical bit..... I'm pretty sure that the cassette is one of those old screw on free hub jobbies. If so can I simply unscrew this and screw on a track cog?? I seem to remeber reading this somewhere but just wanted to check.

cheers.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 10:55 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun May 14, 2006 5:38 pm
Posts: 936
Location: Sussex
You can but it is known as a suicide cog for obvious reasons. If you crank it up real tight and use a BB lockring with decent locktite and use two brakes you should be fine. A proper track hub has a thread the same but in addition a smaller left-hand thread that the lockring screws onto. If you use the fixie for braking (ie backwards pressure) then the cog tries to turn against the lockring which being a LH thread tightens up rather than loosens.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:03 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2007 1:29 pm
Posts: 35
Location: East Yorkshire
I have no intention of running the bike with anything less than two brakes :wink:

thanks for your help.


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 Post subject: suicide hub
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 1:32 am 
BoTM Winner / PoTM Winner
BoTM Winner / PoTM Winner
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Joined: Sat Jan 13, 2007 10:44 pm
Posts: 1184
Location: norcal
1.loctite cog on hub,wait a day

2.loctite lockring,wait a day


ride,enjoy,pony up for a real fixed hub.fixed gear(or wheel like you guys call em) is soooo much fun

(if'n the lawyers ask, i didnt recommend anything)


Last edited by hollister on Wed Nov 21, 2007 12:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:05 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:27 pm
Posts: 2728
Location: In the Woods. . .
hollisters description is all I do. . .
But bear in mind, when I went to see the track championships in Ghent, no-one used lockrings (less weight), as tehy said you NEVER get enough back pedal force to unwind compared to haw much forwards welly you put on it. UCI regs say juniors must use lockrings (not so powerful the screw the cog on hypertight I guess??), but seniors a lockring isn't compulsory. Hope this helps. never had one unwind yet . . . :wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:36 am 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 11:14 pm
Posts: 3844
Location: Somerset
I had converted my Apollo (27" wheel) road bike to fixed wheel when I was at school, the chap across the road from my parents is a keen cyclist (He is now in his '60's, has had a heart bypass and still rides an early '80's Dawes Galaxy, Audax stylee with Mavic hubs and Simplex gears 8) ) and he gave me a 27" track rear wheel.

I don't remember that having a lock ring. But it did have 2 cogs, so it was a proper fixed hub. Unfortunatelty that bike was thrown out by my parents when I went away to sea, obviously figured that I would not need it when I had newer ones there. I am glad I have my own house now! :wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:56 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2006 1:12 am
Posts: 2461
Location: Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
I've never run the lock ring on my track bike either so you'll probably be fine without.

The only issue you may have is the offset on the hub and geting a good chain line.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 2:57 pm 
MacRetro rider
MacRetro rider

Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 4:16 pm
Posts: 8658
Wheel offset can be a problem but if the chainstay clearance allows it you can use chainring spacers to move the chainring inboard. Hubjub on the internet are a good source of these. Chain alighnment is very important for smooth running and chain not coming off !

As a freewheel hub has a wider threaded portion than a fixie hub for the mounting of the sprocket it will take longer to unwind itself if you shift it from back pedalling and believe me you feel it shift and thus quickly pedal forward to resite it. In short a lockring is not an absolute must on a converted freewheel hub.

Cheers


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 11:48 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2006 2:27 pm
Posts: 2728
Location: In the Woods. . .
if using an old wheel, you can always swap the hub spacers around to move the sprocket further out for a better chainline. Re dish with 360 degrees off all drive side spokes, and 360 degrees on all non driveside. Check the dish, and see if it needs more. Otherwise, a rebuild is advisable if its something a bit more posh, or if you want to do a 'proper' job.
See how much you like it first. Fixed is an aquired taste, but its a taste I can't get rid of.. . . :wink:


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