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PostPosted: Mon Mar 14, 2011 4:21 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
rider | rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:42 pm
Posts: 5131
Location: Wakefield, Yorkshire
rusty bodie wrote:
yup, i still use tubs - they are far more likely not to puncture on the paris-roubaix like roads of scotland than hi pressured rims! vittoria tub glue is still available and i even squeeze the tubes of glue into my original 1980s dunlop rim cement tin with it's built in brush on the reverse side of the lid!!

ok, a bit sad but hey i like it that way!!

rusty :D

Image
Image


That's a modern tin! Mine's a lot older than that :wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 1:06 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 12:31 am
Posts: 585
Location: London
I've always had tubular wheels, and have bought quite a lot of NOS tubs but have not used them all that much before. But I've decided to use them more now.

I've probably got enough so that I'll never have to buy anymore. Some of them are at least 15 to 20 years, and one pair must be more than 25. I think I'll first use the newer ones first, eg the Thailand made Vittorias. The big problem is how long will they stay in a good condition, there's no point of saving them if they just dry out and crumble to dust, which they will eventually.

Some of the stash:
Image

I always try to repair a puncture, it's actually quite straight forward once you've found where the hole is. If the hole is tiny and it's a slow puncture, then it's a bit of pain trying to find it. Sealant might be OK for tubs like Tufo which are not repairable, but I'm certainly not going squirt some horrible gunge into my nice lightweight tubs.

We all know tubs are great but it's not just the tyres, I think it's also the rims; the classic shallow box section sprint rim is always going to be stronger or lighter than a HP/clincher rim, and I think more comfortable.

However there are some drawbacks:

Latex tubes; need to keep the bike off the ground if you're not pumping them up regularly. Training tubs don't have this problem though.

Not practical if riding for any length of time away from home, like touring. I suppose you could carry 2 or more spare tubs and do any repairs in the evening during the overnight stay but HPs/clinchers are more convenient in this case.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 1:30 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:22 pm
Posts: 1994
Location: North Ayrshire
OH MY GODDDDD!! :shock:

CORSA CX!?!! :D
DROOL, DROOL!!

...ppssssssssss!! :(

lol i never complete one race without a puncture
on those tubs as gorgeous as they are! now. the wolber
pro 84 and neo pro were much more suited to scottish
road racing, if a little less glamourous!!

fantastic collection!

rusty :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 3:05 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
rider | rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:42 pm
Posts: 5131
Location: Wakefield, Yorkshire
rusty bodie wrote:
OH MY GODDDDD!! :shock:

CORSA CX!?!! :D
DROOL, DROOL!!

...ppssssssssss!! :(

lol i never complete one race without a puncture
on those tubs as gorgeous as they are! now. the wolber
pro 84 and neo pro were much more suited to scottish
road racing, if a little less glamourous!!

fantastic collection!

rusty :D


I won't show you my Crono Setas and Pista Seta's then. I'm afraid of what might happen :shock:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 15, 2011 4:58 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:22 pm
Posts: 1994
Location: North Ayrshire
no please don't! tubs like that were the stuff of fiction and meticulously swept and pot=hole free tarmacadam roads!! :lol:


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 Post subject: Tubs
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 6:34 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2009 9:57 pm
Posts: 641
cromoman wrote:
How effective is the Vittoria Pitstop type stuff at fixing punctured tubs? Does it get you home?


remember that some tubs, especially Tufo and some of the Continental and Vittoria, are really 'tubeless' and can only be repaired with some form of sealer.
Cheapest way, and this works with slow punctures in conventional tube type tubs, is to buy a motor car size repair can and a valve adapter from schrader to presta.
You can repair up to 4 tyres with a large can for about £5.
You can also fill them with it just in case you get a nick while out as it will reseal the tub.
Also use superglue to use on the outside to stick the split rubber.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 2:50 am 
PoTM & rBoTY Winner
PoTM & rBoTY Winner
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Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 7:30 pm
Posts: 2046
Location: ARIZONA
Only on one bike, that doesn't get a lot of saddle time now. Four years ago for the two years I was living in Japan I was on it for 30-40 kilos a day.

THIS STUFF is awesome, but I used regular glue from time to time too:
Image

The nice thing was the roads there are perfect. No potholes, no glass, no gaps. I stopped riding tubulars regularly once I came back to the states. New Haven streets would eat 'em up.


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