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 Post subject: 10 speed v 5 speed
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 7:41 pm 
retrobike rider
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Newbie to road bikes, would there be a reason why a bike was built with 5 speed as opposed to 10? I ask because the frame only has fittings for a rear mech only, and I do not know any better as to if I should keep to 5 or make it 10 by using one of those guides at the bottom of the frame rail to direct the cable to the front mech.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 8:28 pm 
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10 gears will make your cycling easier than sticking with 5. Your body operates at a certain rpm, or cadence, ideally 60-70 rpm. Unlike a car engine which can vary from 1000 to 8000 rpm, you cannot pedal 8 times as fast as your basic rate, so the more gears you have the easier it is for you to maintain a steady cadence and be efficient and comfortable.

Reasons why? Five speed is cheaper to make than 10, cheaper to sell more units. Technology evolves, I think the current highest number of gears on a cassette is 9, so that gives 27 gears with a triple chainring.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 8:31 pm 
King of the Skip Monkeys
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Supratada wrote:
10 gears will make your cycling easier than sticking with 5. Your body operates at a certain rpm, or cadence, ideally 60-70 rpm. Unlike a car engine which can vary from 1000 to 8000 rpm, you cannot pedal 8 times as fast as your basic rate, so the more gears you have the easier it is for you to maintain a steady cadence and be efficient and comfortable.

Reasons why? Five speed is cheaper to make than 10, cheaper to sell more units. Technology evolves, I think the current highest number of gears on a cassette is 9, so that gives 27 gears with a triple chainring.


A 5 speed could have been either a cheapy or a specific time trial or similar

and cassettes are up to 11spd these days.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 8:45 pm 
retrobike rider
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Thx for replies, so tell me more about

specific time trial or similar

please, as its a hand built frame so it must have been done for a reason rather than mass produced.

also i see a lot of refrenece made to tight geometry in this case the rear tyre is very close to the seat tube, and if possible for a front mech to be fitted will be very tight!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 8:49 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
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legrandefromage wrote:

A 5 speed could have been either a cheapy or a specific time trial or similar

and cassettes are up to 11spd these days.


But that doesn't necessarily mean you'd get 33 useable gears. It does mean you'd get 11 sprockets with a minimal difference between for smoother changes but not all of them efficiently useable on a triple in the extreme positions (ie big sprocket on big chainring and small sprocket on small chainring. They'd probably go in but mechanically not good!)

'5 Speed' in the good old days was generally on a base model bike (before that it was 4 and before that 3) and a double chainset was an upgrade. Unless of course you were a time triallist and used 5 very close high gears - which is a different matter altogether.

EDIT - just seen your next post. It sounds like a time trial bike built for short distance events on flat courses where a wide choice of gears is unnecessary. 13 to 17 or 14 to 18 were common. In fact, very frequently only the top 2 or 3 were used. Alf Engers only had 3 sprockets fitted - and he generally used the smallest most of the time!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 9:08 pm 
retrobike rider
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sorry for drip feeding info, the 5 gear group set is dura ace and the rear cluster is all very close, one tooth between each gear I think, frame seem light alas no identification of tube set,


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 9:44 pm 
King of the Skip Monkeys
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I found a decent frame down the tip kitted out with a rear shifter and 5 speeds (all Campagnolo Nuovo too!)

set up for time trials - after learning from people who actually know (Ned!)

Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 10:01 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:28 pm
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Location: North Wales
I have a 5 speed. It's got downtube shifters, so I don't tend to change gear much anyway 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 11:04 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
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bhill22 wrote:
sorry for drip feeding info, the 5 gear group set is dura ace and the rear cluster is all very close, one tooth between each gear I think, frame seem light alas no identification of tube set,


Can you provide a photo? Sounds like it is a TT bike.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 11:13 pm 
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legrandefromage wrote:
A 5 speed could have been either a cheapy or a specific time trial or similar

and cassettes are up to 11spd these days.


11? Well I never. How thin is the chain then? There's only so much you can dish a rear wheel.


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