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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:41 am 
r.B.o.T.M. & P.o.T.M. Winner
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NakedGav wrote:
Spokesmann wrote:
Tubular tyres... horrible IMHO.


Tubs for race wheels - Fantastic
Tubs for every day wheels - impractical.

:D :D :D


I agree, never found a reason to dabble with these things.
Best left to the professionals or wannabe racers...


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:42 am 
r.B.o.T.M. & P.o.T.M. Winner
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NakedGav wrote:
Spokesmann wrote:
Tubular tyres... horrible IMHO.


Tubs for race wheels - Fantastic
Tubs for every day wheels - impractical.

:D :D :D


I agree, never found a reason to dabble with these things.
Best left to the professionals or wannabe racers...


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 4:58 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2008 2:11 pm
Posts: 303
I used to use sew ups back in the day. Hassle, but so much faster than clinchers.

More recently I have used Tufo "tubular clinchers" easier to use than old school tubs because they don't need gluing. Not quite as light as proper tubs. However they ride a little better due to a slightly higher volume. I think Tufo recommend using sealant in all their tubs, but I never injected it until I got a flat. Modern sealants are so much better than the old stuff that they are not just a "limp home" solution, but will last for many, many miles at full pressure on most punctures. They cant't, however, cope with larger holes but they're not something you come across much on the road.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 6:50 pm 
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If you've never ridden Clement No. 1 Seta Extra tubs at 130psi, you haven't lived!

I still remember the sound of these on the concrete slabs of the Southend Arterial Road in the early 1980s - like someone tearing silk cloth next to your earhole! 8)


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:04 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 03, 2008 12:31 am
Posts: 585
Location: London
Silk tubs make an amazing sizzling sound! I have this on a 300g rim (Mavic GEL280):
Image
The complete wheel with tub is 880g, with no carbon or ti.

Not only do tubs have a comfortable ride, traditional tubs are the best looking tyres of all time. I mean just take a look at this:
Image
Actually I prefer silver polished rims but the tub was on this rim when I took the photo.

Re:"tubular clinchers", all the disadvantages and none of the advantages, of both tubs and HPs. Heavier and less comfortable clincher rim, cannot use spares tubes and/or puncture kit for multiple puncture repairs on the road which are lighter than a spare tub or two, cannot be repaired easily (in the case of Tufo tubs, not at all, i.e. you can't patched it). And...Tufo tubs are ugly.



Lastpubrunner: please rename this thread to "Tubular tyres and wheels".


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2010 10:49 pm 
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Location: Cotswolds
My first tubulars were in 1950, constrictor pre WW2, on wonderful wood rims, which survived many miles in the rain.. These tubulars had no stitching, but were still repairable.
From then till the early 1980's rarely used anything but tubulars for all riding, sometimes perhaps 15000 miles a year.
Last road races in 1980 were on Clement fine silk 6 ounce road tyres (green label).
One of the reasons for the superiority of tubular tyres in my early days was the weakness of the rims for wired on tyres.

Spokesmann, your web site index is throwing an error, do you ever trim your mudguard stays? It's probably against the health and safety laws to leave them sticking out.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 30, 2010 11:28 pm 
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You know I've read some curious things in my time, however Fiks you really take the biscuit. Good looking tyres? They're tyres FFS. They're round and that's about it. And who really cares? They're for riding on, not looking at.

Furthermore most people, even cyclists, couldn't spot the difference between a clincher and a tubular at a range of more than a few feet.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2010 6:13 am 
r.B.o.T.M. & P.o.T.M. Winner
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keithglos wrote:
My first tubulars were in 1950, constrictor pre WW2, on wonderful wood rims, which survived many miles in the rain.. These tubulars had no stitching, but were still repairable.
From then till the early 1980's rarely used anything but tubulars for all riding, sometimes perhaps 15000 miles a year.
Last road races in 1980 were on Clement fine silk 6 ounce road tyres (green label).
One of the reasons for the superiority of tubular tyres in my early days was the weakness of the rims for wired on tyres.

Spokesmann, your web site index is throwing an error, do you ever trim your mudguard stays? It's probably against the health and safety laws to leave them sticking out.


No I never trim them. :)


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2010 1:03 pm 
rider | rBoTM Winner
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GarethPJ wrote:
You know I've read some curious things in my time, however Fiks you really take the biscuit. Good looking tyres? They're tyres FFS. They're round and that's about it. And who really cares? They're for riding on, not looking at.

Furthermore most people, even cyclists, couldn't spot the difference between a clincher and a tubular at a range of more than a few feet.


I - and a lot of other people - can. Tubulars on a restored Classic are for looking at - and occasionally riding on. I ride tubulars in some time trials when riding 'Old Skool' and notice the difference. Next year I might fit my Vittoria Crono Seta Extras and get deafened by the roar on smooth dual carriageways!

Whatever you might think, Tubulars do ride 'zippier' than the average 'clincher'(horrid americanism!) and when I were a lad they were all that was available apart from really heavy 27" tyres which didn't fit racing frames. We rode them all year.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 31, 2010 1:43 pm 
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Location: Surrey
Ned, you'll probably remember the Wolber Juniors, Kowalits Kriteriums and Barum tubs. Fond memories of rubbish 1960s kit! 8)


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