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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:44 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 2396
Location: Sheffield, top city
CO2 = great, but if you find the tyre aint seated properly, you have no control of stopping and re-seating the tyre - at worst, it blows off the rim and destroys the tube, at best, the cartridge is empty and youre walking.

Pumps, the problem with retro pumps is, if they are plastic bodied, with age the plastic develops hairline cracks (invisible to the eye) lengthwise with the grain which mean the pump lacks pressure. If you can find something with a metal body go for it. (also pertinent to those mini pumps)

If you fit a frame pump under the top tube, you need a pip on the back of the head tube to stop it sliding down the head tube to the headtube/downtube intersection. Functionally, this is ok, aesthetically its not


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:23 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sat May 21, 2011 7:42 am
Posts: 334
Location: Glasgow (ish)
Quote:
Don't even bother, most frame pumps won't get you enough air pressure to do anything other than limp home. Get a couple of C02 cartridges and be done with it.


I use a 20 yo plastic Zefal, which is capable of putting 100psi in a tyre fairly quickly, and never runs out. Whereas CO2 cartridges can't be be used for a 2nd puncture... What happens to used CO2 cartridges? Landfill?


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 6:31 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:14 pm
Posts: 93
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vintage-Styl ... ctupt=true

That’s pretty much the pump I was thinking of, remember my parents old bikes having them, is metal too so should spray up nicely. Quality of pumping coming second to aesthetics in this case.

Planning on using the frame to upgrade my pub single speed from a gas pipe Raleigh Nova but also have the potential to get it eroica ready just in case. Might as well spray up some mudguards while I’m at it!


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 Post subject: Re: Frame pump advice
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:50 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:04 pm
Posts: 2309
Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
For a pump like that, (rather than a frame-fit), I'd go for 2x pump pegs on the front centreline of the LF seatstay.
Nicely tucked away from feet, brakes and panniers.
Attachment:
seat stay.jpg
seat stay.jpg [ 16.3 KiB | Viewed 393 times ]

Under the TT just gets in the way of carrying, shouldering or handling the bike, specially on a touring bike.
On the ST also gets in the way and reduces your bottle location options.

All the best,


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 7:49 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:14 pm
Posts: 93
That’s the kiddy right there. Just need to figure out how to hold the awkward little buggers in place while I braze them on.


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 Post subject: Re: Frame pump advice
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 8:25 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:04 pm
Posts: 2309
Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
More involved craft method with the lovely tapered Takahashi ones:
Attachment:
Screen Shot 2018-11-14 at 19.09.18.png
Screen Shot 2018-11-14 at 19.09.18.png [ 15.4 KiB | Viewed 382 times ]

    -Piece of steel flat about 6" long with a slot cut in one end.
    -Make the slot the right size to fit half way down the tapered shaft.
    -Rest the other end of the flat onto the other seatstay.
    -Weight of the flat keeps the peg in place as you braze it.

Quick and easy production method with the cheaper 'bent nail' style ones (or the Takahashi):
Attachment:
9021244396_e3f104fd6c_c.jpg
9021244396_e3f104fd6c_c.jpg [ 53.51 KiB | Viewed 382 times ]

    -Cut a small length of brazing rod, set this aside on the bench
    -Hold the peg with some needle-nosed locking pliers, and dip it into the flux paste to coat the end
    -Dab the fluxed end of the peg onto the rod clipping to pick it up
    -Hold the peg on the tube in position
    -Heat the lot while pressing down on the rod to stop it moving as the water boils out of the flux.
    -As it gets up to heat, you'll feel it melt.
    -Push down and position the peg and remove the heat.

For both versions and methods, it's well worth filing the underside of the peg to fit the tube profile.
This not only looks better, and keeps it in line, but it helps to stop the peg trying to turn as you braze.

All the best,


Last edited by danson67 on Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:42 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:14 pm
Posts: 93
Awesome, thanks. I’ve got some of those Takahashi ones from Ceeway, they seem to be the only items from there without a curved base, good tips though.
Seems like the hard bit will be getting the second one to line up with the first!

Just need to get the pump and find a bit of time now.

Here’s the frame before and after a sandblast, didn’t know Suntour made dropouts.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/157053716@N06/R3UDkk


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 Post subject: Re: Frame pump advice
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 11:51 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:04 pm
Posts: 2309
Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
Just file a profile on the underside in line with the peg, which matches the seatstay shape.
That way it all lines up pretty naturally.
You can fine tune the alignment of the peg part later as they are malleable steel and have that thin neck.

All the best,


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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 6:12 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 2396
Location: Sheffield, top city
Southwestslacker1 wrote:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vintage-Style-Retro-16-Chrome-Steel-Bicycle-Hand-Pump-Chrome-Pegs-LEroica/331325156300?hash=item4d2484abcc:g:CGIAAOSwRLZULCyn:rk:4:pf:1&frcectupt=true

That’s pretty much the pump I was thinking of, remember my parents old bikes having them, is metal too so should spray up nicely. Quality of pumping coming second to aesthetics in this case.

steel is heavy - maybe not too important if its a pubber. Chrome may be prone to rust both inside and outside the barrel.
what about the alloy ones that have the red and blue rubber bands on them? I have one of those and it works well and is about 40 yrs old


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 Post subject: Re: Frame pump advice
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 7:16 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:04 pm
Posts: 2309
Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
Bluemels?:
Attachment:
s-l1600.jpg
s-l1600.jpg [ 172.71 KiB | Viewed 351 times ]

If you can find a long un-dented one they do polish up beautifully with a bit of T-Cut.

Fit one of these and you don't need the hose:
Attachment:
s-l1600-1.jpg
s-l1600-1.jpg [ 40.36 KiB | Viewed 349 times ]


All the best,


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