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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 10:39 am 
King of the Skip Monkeys
King of the Skip Monkeys
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Joined: Wed Nov 07, 2007 4:34 pm
Posts: 26146
Location: Moomin Valley
development_cycle wrote:
Wanted to keep the V's I already have really. Wasn't intended to be a dropper so have loads of bits already for a standard mtb set up


Am using V levers from Dia-Compe with LX levers with bar end shifters.

Using road STI causes headaches with front mech shifting if using MTB parts as cable pull, reach and leverage vary.

Cantis and STI are fine as there are loads of methods for cabling but for V brakes, its travel agent time.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:24 pm 
BoTY Winner
BoTY Winner

Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 8:50 pm
Posts: 315
Location: United States
You're kind of missing the whole point if you're using STI shifters/levers in my opinion. Your hands would be in the wrong place when you're shifting. I know shifter perches are hard to come by but bar end shifters work great too.

The Ibis has rm-3 bars which really doesn't work well with shifter mounts.

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I would probably swap to rm-2 bars like the Salsa at some point.

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The problem with a lot of the set ups in this thread is that as somebody way back in page 2 or 3 mentioned....you have to get the drops of the bars up like where your flat bars would be so that's why LD or Salsa P10 stems are perfect. Looks a bit goofy but if you tried it, you would see how comfortable and natural it feels.

If it looks like a road bike set up, it's really not the ideal set up. The Ibis is not great since the stem is short. The Salsa is fantastic.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 7:38 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:46 pm
Posts: 962
Location: Montpellier, France
Thanks for the detail shots, some good ideas there. Loving the black cotton bar tape - really suits it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 5:03 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:17 am
Posts: 634
Location: New England
This is a 1985-ish Marinoni Moose that I've been building up with drop bars, took my second ride on it yesterday and nearly froze to death, but it's fun and works well. The build is still 'in progress' so no final tape on the bars and cables have not been cut to length, etc. The long wheelbase is very stable in the snow....it's a tank. Triple-pulley ARX rear derailleur requires a longer chain!

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For shifting, I decided to reinvent the wheel. I wanted to use Suntour XC thumbies (that will be the primary build group on the bike), but I wanted them in the drops somehow. I ended up making my own bases and attaching them to the levers:

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So far it's working better than expected, I still have some spacing issues to work out as the shift levers are somewhat in the way in the middle gears-the shifter body needs to move away from the brake body a couple more centimeters. I was surprised to find I can still ride on the hoods, my thumb follows the curve of the shifter perfectly. Rear shifting is stiff, I'll need to find a way to get friction out of the system somehow.

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Front brake cable routing was an issue-I can't use a stem/headset cable stop (not enough steerer on the fork), so I adapted a V-brake noodle. Cable pull is smooth, no issues.

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I need to spend more time in the saddle before I'm 100% sold on the riding position-right now it seems like the bars should be a bit higher. That's just fit though,the riding position is surprisingly natural, and it somehow doesn't feel like a road bike. I'm sold!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 5:30 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:25 pm
Posts: 1785
Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
Some very cool recent posts. As you were.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 6:42 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 6:41 pm
Posts: 49
Lately, I have been riding more, wrenching less, and practicing N-3+1. Here is +1.

I have been intrigued by some of the new "Gravel Grinders" on the market, particularly the Salsa Ti Vaya. So, before I dropped serious cash on the Vaya, I wanted to see what I could come up with. Besides, it's more fun that way and keeps me from engaging in antisocial behavior.

So, I began searching for just the right Ti MTB frame. For a drop bar setup, it needed to be a fairly large, older frame (shorter TT) built for a rigid fork (more HT). This really put me in the late 80's and early 90's (C&V).

I finally found the right frame -- a 1990 Russian frame manufactured for a Dutch bike company. The very kind and knowledgeable Dutch seller described the heritage to me as follows:

[INDENT][INDENT]Many thanks for your shown interest ! A Dutchman ( Gijs van Tuyl) took up the idea to go east and have frames built from Russian army spec titanium. The early frames were also built at army facilities , I think this was near Novigrod. Later van Tuyl got EU money to start also other eatern Europe production facilities. Comparing the frame with other brands is difficult , I tried to make the description in the auction as honest and detailed as possible . In short: well built (good proportions , well welded) with many integrated details , the shaping of the tubes could have been better . The bike you built with this frame will be a good versitale ride.[/INDENT][/INDENT]

The frame arrived last week and I just finished the build. The components are a combination of old and new that I like and had around. The design is really function driven. My most specific design detail was to stick with the threaded fork so I could use a tall (VO) stem adapter with threadless stems. The combination of several inches of useful stem plus a choice of threadless stems of different lengths and angles gives me a great deal of fit flexibility for different conditions.

I am also considering whether it would be possible to convert the bike to 700 wheels so I could pool different wheel/tire/cassette combinations with my cyclocross bike.

Does anyone make long reach cantis that would work for the conversion or how about V-brakes.

At any rate, it's hit 60 degrees here and I'm out the door to grind.

Have a great weekend.

RFC

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 9:08 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2008 3:12 pm
Posts: 197
wow.
can't answer your questions, but I just want to say that THAT LOOKS FANTASTIC - well done.


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 Post subject: My Drop Bar MTB
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 4:32 am 
Newbie

Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2012 4:26 am
Posts: 8
Location: Philadelphia
This is obviously built more for the mean streets than the mud and rocks, at least without a tire change, but hopefully some will appreciate it. The frame is most likely a Merlin as indicated by the serial number, but Litespeed remains a possibility. The Huffy decals were a nice touch I think 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 4:33 am 
Newbie

Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2012 4:26 am
Posts: 8
Location: Philadelphia
Sorry...it wouldn't let me post in the first message:


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Anyway, as can be seen in the photos, there are a lot of similarities between what RFC did and what I did. He actually helped inspire me to keep this frame rather than flipping it...which definitely ended up a fortuitous decision. The bike is quite quick handling for its wheelbase, light and easy to move in and out of the house, pretty near indestructible and a whole lot of fun!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 7:09 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:46 pm
Posts: 962
Location: Montpellier, France
Aaron - that looks great: any more pictures with the dirt tyres? I like those shifters, they look easier to use than bar-end shifters. How do you get on with them?


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