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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 9:24 pm 
Concours Judge
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Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2005 3:59 pm
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Location: a proper EU country
gump wrote:
Nice blue seat skewer elev... :wink:


Yeah, I know. All those parts had to go when I rediscovered the sport about 5 ago, but it did the job.

I digged up another pic:

Image

SkyCarbolite bicycle only few moments after taking delivery of it. It is an awesome frame with carbon in front and titanium for the rear. I smashed the tt really hard at the rocks. Maybe I could still use it, but I replaced it. Were insured :lol: , bought 2 frames from Koga old stock and had enough money left to built them both. The carbon tube has alloy inside and maybe that prevented it from total collapse. I still have that Rond fork on another bike (but with another crown). With a Zocchi I had an unpleasant snapped crown experience (Ouch!) and that why the bikes in my earlier post are rigid. The bar is Renthall.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 12:12 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2006 10:39 am
Posts: 74
Location: Tassie
My Salsa has a flogged out head tube, creaks a bit but still rides lovely. Retired from regular off road use.
Bought a Cannondale Scalpel not long after they were released, ex demo. Cracked the carbon chainstay, probably due to chainsuck despite best efforts to protect it there. Lasted 18 months & got a new one on warranty.
Replaced it with a DMR Switchback, trashed it in a month, new one is still going strong after 2 years, fingers crossed.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 9:18 pm 
BoTM Winner
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Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2005 2:17 pm
Posts: 755
Location: South London
The only bike I broke was my BMX, a Raleigh Burner. It was a fatigue failure after three years of heavy use (mostly road and a bit of off road but no BMX tricks). Some silly stuff though ... (mine's the rear one).

Image

First the downtube and headtube parted company. I used it for a while bodged with lots of tape, it had kind of a suspension effect which was odd. I then had it welded by the local car repair shop, if held for a while and then finally both toptube and downtube gave up and the bike snapped in two.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 10:01 pm 
BoTM Winner
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2005 7:22 pm
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Location: Wooster, Ohio
Unfortunately, I have no breathtaking/exciting stories to add. I have always been a staunch believer in building frames and riding bikes that are overbuilt and will endure whatever is thown at them, providing only smiles of relief when the dust clears.

Despite numerous broken bones, I have never had one single dent tube, let alone a broken frame. Highlights of the unbelievable...

- wiped out on a downhill switchback on a ridge (going too fast :) ) and the bike and I tumbled twenty feet down to the cliff edge. I luckily caught a pine tree but the bike fell 40 feet off the cliff. End result, two tacoed wheels, bent seat post, and one flawless Grove Hardcore frame.

- while enjoying a beautiful Appalacian day I was hit by numerous beer cans (some full) from some local dirtbags. They swung their pick up around and hit me from behind with the truck, driving me into a ditch. One **** up rear wheel, loooong physical recovery, not a dent in the rw frame.

- My latest wipe out this fall (see off topic forum) ended in broken BB, wheels, and three broken ribs and a pelvic arch. Frame ok :D

Lessons learned...IMHO, forget the race for lighter, new techy materials and build a frame that will last for the life of your riding ambitions. If you want a ride that is light and fast, keep the bike solid and focus on the rider...push away from the table a bit sooner at supper.

Solid advice, but I've always found it easier to spend cash on lighter parts that to resist a lonely piece of pie...know what I mean?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 10:08 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Location: Wookey Hole
rody wrote:
My latest wipe out this fall (see off topic forum) ended in broken BB, wheels, and three broken ribs and a pelvic arch. Frame ok :D


Pelvic arch sounds painful...you riding again yet?

rody wrote:
Solid advice, but I've always found it easier to spend cash on lighter parts that to resist a lonely piece of pie...know what I mean?


I hear what you're saying :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 4:00 am 
BoTM Winner
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Location: Wooster, Ohio
John,

Got out last week for the first time since the spill...beautiful sunny day, 50 degrees, and stayed upright the whole time :D

Putting the finishing touches on the new Grove Assault tonight, hope to take it out tomorrow for a bit. Hoping the temps break above 30

keep it groovy,

rody


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 9:49 am 
BoTM Winner
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Posts: 2765
Location: NW England
sylvain wrote:
First the downtube and headtube parted company. I used it for a while bodged with lots of tape, it had kind of a suspension effect which was odd.

IIRC thats how the Slingshot first came about
From first flight
Early 1970’s: Inspiration; Enter Mark Groendal, inventor and builder of the Sling Shot bicycle frame design. Mark was a fun loving kid doing what good kids do in the heartland of America (Michigan). One day he was riding his mini-motor-bike that had a frame design similar to a standard rigid diamond bicycle frame. At some point the frame begat a noticeably smoother ride over bumps and other obstacles. Upon inspection he discovered the frame’s down tube had broken. Thus the discovery that flex, as a type of suspension, can be a beneficial property to a two wheeled vehicle used in an off-road capacity.

So yeah you got it spot on!


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 10:07 am 
Concours Judge
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rody wrote:
End result, two tacoed wheels, bent seat post, and one flawless Grove Hardcore frame.



Grove Hardcore - That was the thing overhere back then. Of course nobody had one, we only knew it of pics

Rody, is there a a resemblance between the Hardcore and your own RW?


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 7:45 pm 
BoTM Winner
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Melvin,

There are similarities between the Grove Hardcore and the rw...

both share a 2.0" x .035" downtube bi-ovalized, 1.25" x .028" top tube and 1.5" x 028" butted seat tube with 26.8 post insert.

However, the differences are many...

The geometry of the Hardcore was very steep and woodsy, 72.5 head tube, 73 seat tube and a HIGH 13.5" bottem bracket with 16.75 chainstays and horizontal dropouts. Made it very quick in the woods but a handful to descend with and difficult to balance at slow speeds.

The rw relaxed the geometry to parallel 72's, 11.75" bottem bracket with 16.5" chainstays and vertical drops. Struck a nice balance in woodsy technicality and steady control.

I also sloped the top tube and added the seat tube brace to get ample standover and tightened the front triangle, keeping things stiff and energy efficient.

Loved the Hardcore for what it was but the rw has proven to be a better performer for the long haul. She's going to paint next week and will be reborn for another 15 years of play :D

cheers,

rody


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2006 9:26 pm 
Concours Judge
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rody wrote:
I also sloped the top tube and added the seat tube brace to get ample standover and tightened the front triangle, keeping things stiff and energy efficient.


Yes, I've seen that construction: http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=570 Smart!

You should give your RW the same paintjob as your old Hardcore :D :shock:

Melvin


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