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 Post subject: Having the right tools
PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2018 11:39 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sun Feb 01, 2009 9:27 pm
Posts: 471
Location: Abingdon
Fallen a bit out of love with my preferred LBS of late following a series of let downs, so have taken to tackling a few more jobs myself.

Some jobs have necessitated buying new tools in order to ensure that I don't bodge stuff like I used to, and my god having the right tools doesn't half make working on bikes more enjoyable!
Case in point - pressing a NOS OEM headset in to my much loved KHS meant buying a headset pressing tool, and I bagged a brand new Park Tool for a knock down price. The job was done in seconds! So quick and easy that I almost felt like knocking the cups back out (with the correct tool I may add), just so I could put them back in again :lol:

No more using a mallet and lump of wood for me! 8)

/waiting for more tools to arrive...


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 02, 2018 11:51 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2015 7:29 pm
Posts: 4433
Location: peak district
:lol: sounds familiar. I too treated myself to a headset press as i didnt want to destroy my Ti frames, always used wood and a hammer but that was always on steel frames. I couldnt believe how easy they went in also, and now i use it on steel frames as well :D


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 12:05 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:01 pm
Posts: 4808
Thats a well trodden path for many of us. Walking miles home with a banjaxed bike repair did it for me way back in the early 80s. Built up my tool collection ever since. When you do things properly yourself you never have issues and out on the trail you know how to fix things.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 12:51 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2014 5:25 am
Posts: 53
Location: Idaho
Yea, you do what you gotta do sometimes!?

But it sure is nice to have the right tools for certain things like anything that is a press-fit or needs Pullers.

I've destroyed my share of High-end parts without the proper tools :facepalm:
Steel bike are alot more forgiving than alloy's or carbon. Aluminum $hit strip'n even under low torque.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 6:20 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:47 pm
Posts: 889
Location: Newbury, Berkshire
Over recent years I have built up a collection of most tools that a LBS would have. Mainly Park Tools but some Ice Toolz, X-Tools and Pedro's.

The real dilemma for me was whether to buy a Crown Race Puller. It is a big outlay for a tool that is only occasionally used, but I ended up buying the Park Tools CRP-2, which are over £200 :shock:. It is so lovely to use though, and bashing off a Crown Race with the Screw Driver is now a distant memory.

Pip.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 8:57 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:31 pm
Posts: 1022
Location: somewhere in time
5 years ago a well known bikeshop went bankrupt. I was able to buy a lot of nice tools from them. Used but fine. I'd let go any bike for a nice set of professional tools.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 9:36 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:51 am
Posts: 412
Location: Bolton
Spent my youth smashing cranks off BB's with a piece of wood and a hammer. Crank puller made all the difference!!!

I made my own headset press with some timber and threaded bar. Nothing like as quick & easy as the proper tool, but better than hammering I guess.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 10:01 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2007 1:35 pm
Posts: 1153
Location: SHEFFIELD
I've made a very serviceable headset remover from an old seatpost with a cross cut into the bottom end about 40mm deep, and then bent the sides out just enough to catch on the cup. Also, got a crown race fitting tool, that is basically an old (heavy) head tube, that was once a Raleigh paint sample, from the shop I worked in years ago. They both do the job very well

Decent cable cutters are essential, as are crank pullers - cheap ones break far too easily, and you need the correct sort (ISIS/octalink vs square taper.
Half decent chain tool is good too, but powerlink type things mean they don't get as much use as they used to...

Si F

Some good deals on tools from Planet-x and Superstar.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 4:09 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2012 2:26 am
Posts: 867
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Agree. Don’t even waste my time bodging anymore.
When ordering my Cannondale Supersix i also ordered their spidering crank and chainring tools, work superbly.
I have an ‘80s Carlton with proprietary headset locknuts in a special design (‘80s era 600 and Dura-Ace only), i’d been doing them up by hand as never wanted to spoil them with a pipe wrench.. then last month i found a Polish company called “Bitul” which makes the exact correct reproduction spanners and less than 20 quid shipped, i thought they’d be cheapo but took a punt - they arrived promtly and are of rather decent quality and a superb fit. Rather chuffed.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2018 10:29 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:25 pm
Posts: 2061
Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
Good tools = Good investment

I'm still using tools regularly that I bought as a kid to maintain a paper round bike. As materials got lighter
and moved away from steel the need for the right tool is paramount. Cyclus, Shimano or Campag tools are also good
quality, but I have given up with bike specific pedal spanners as they always chew up because they are so
thin. Made my own out of a Facom 15mm spanner and 50cm steel tube which will remove most stubborn pedals.


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