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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:32 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 16747
Location: Yorkshire, England
I've just realised I've been looking at spokes from you on ebay. :lol:
Looking for some silver DB either 2/1.8(or 1.7) or even 1.5's at 267mm length (ideal)

Only one's I have are some old Ritchey Logic I would be reusing if it came to it.


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2013 5:51 pm 
BoTM Winner
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 1:56 pm
Posts: 1020
Location: Guernsey
thanks i have been using normal lube for year but i keep getting told to use linseed or prep. i normally use DT or Aplina spoke and nipple not had much trouble with them. i have some hex alloy one i have not tried yet. I have build maybe 40-50 of wheel over the last 20 years some of which are still going, other errrr not so much. but i would not call myself and expert as i still have stuff to learn, always good to pick the brains of an expert.

thanks and happy trails.
Pete


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2013 6:34 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 10:33 pm
Posts: 2192
Location: Suffolk
Expert steady on.

Use wahatever you want on the threads really just lubriacate them. I do not find issue as such with Sapim nipples just there black brass ones. Nowt wrong with DT Swiss apart from cost and Alpina make decent spokes too but alpina use a different grade of stainless steel with a little less nickel in it I believe. Not a reason not to use them though just an observation.

Fluffy chicken I have Laser's 2.0/1.5/2.0 in 267mm. Race spokes in even lengths 266 or 268mm only. I might have some Alpina 268mm in 2.0/1.7/2.0 I think I have nearly a whole box.


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 1:36 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:08 pm
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Location: I know where the stash is – the secret's safe with me. The flying squad will never find us...
I rarely ever ever get punctures, but fate has just made a timely intervention...

Bought a new tube yesterday to fix a completely flat rear. Got home in the evening and took the wheel apart to give it a good clean and to fit the new tube. Then I noticed what's in the photos.

For a while, when using the rear brakes, there's been a juddering at one point of each rotation. A slight bulging of the rim seemed to be the culprit.

But the real scary monster causing the rim bulge is the giant spreading fissure lurking under the rim tape :shock:

All the 'eyelets' around the nipples are rusting. The main fault line crack in the rim runs at least 5 spokes and from it in each direction, there's a noticeable finer line spreading out around the whole rim.

Basically, the crack has developed and has been spreading as I've been riding – the rim is steadily splitting itself in two. I only discovered this by chance, as I rarely have any flats to repair. Wonder what state the front rim is in, with its now concave rims.

The FIRs have given rock solid service over 23 years – not bad.

It's time to get some new bits and build some wheels :xmas-big-grin:


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 4:17 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:33 am
Posts: 38
Wow, that's quite a canyon you have there! :shock:

I know bicycle wheels are extremely strong, due to the way they're made, but what are the chances of this type of crack causing a sudden catastrophic failure, rather than slowly spreading and getting worse, as here? I threw away an old Mavic non-eyeletted rim when a crack appeared between spoke holes. It was nothing compared to this one but I wasn't prepared to risk riding it any further.


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 4:43 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 10:33 pm
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I think once a crack has appeared reire the rim what is the point in taking risks that you don't need to take. It is a bit like driving around in a car with a tyre with a bulging sidewall, you probably will be fine but there a an increased chance it will go badly wrong.


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 6:28 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2011 8:33 am
Posts: 38
bm0p700f wrote:
I think once a crack has appeared retire the rim what is the point in taking risks that you don't need to take.


Agreed, I'm always wary of older bikes with rim brakes. How much wear has the rim had? Wheels can be expensive but if the hub and spokes are good then fitting a new rim is a far cheaper option and really quite easy.


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Wed Nov 06, 2013 11:16 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:08 pm
Posts: 1251
Location: I know where the stash is – the secret's safe with me. The flying squad will never find us...
One hell of a canyon. The more I look into it, the deeper it gets, man. A bit like the 60's B movie "Crack in the World".

Was in Halfords yesterday afternoon getting spare tubes to fix the flat (not yet knowing about the rim crack) and there was someone in with a nice Kona having repairs done. Looked like their back wheel was pretzeled. Overheard that on examination of the wobbly wheel to be repaired, the manager had spotted a crack right through the rim cross section – it was unrideable. The manager quite rightly told the guy this and that it was dangerous to ride the bike – basically he would need a new wheel. The guy was quibbling about the cost of doing this and just wanted it repaired, but quite rightly Halfords refused. The guy then wanted to ride it away. The mechanic took the back V-brakes apart so that he couldn't ride the bike. The guy tried to ride it the shop. I left the store after that because I couldn't bear to watch the inevitable happen.

I digress...

My wheel's rim walls seem thick enough, but they are being pushed out by the canyon opening up around the rim. These rims are going nowhere though. Also, the hubs are in a bad state. The wheels are about 23 yrs old now. They've seen action in the woods/hills/mountains of S & Mid Wales, traversed the high moors around Halifax and Huddersfield, spent half a dozen years in a damp cellar at my parents old place, and for last few years have been hacking back and forth commuting between Enfield and Wimbledon clocking up 165 miles a week. Time for all new wheels. And a good time to learn how to build my own.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 2:29 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:25 pm
Posts: 1785
Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
Just had another read of this before I build up some solid 700c touring wheels that will double
up for some off-road abuse too. Intend to have rear panniers, and possibly front too when touring,
but will not be loaded like I'm going around the world with the kitchen sink.

Going with LX M563 front hub, LX M565 rear hub, both 36h and rims will be Mavic A719.

For the spokes, thinking of DT Swiss Competion on the front and rear NDS, and plain gauge DT Swiss Champion on the DS. Standard 3 cross pattern. Think I may invest in a spoke tension gizmo too as I can foresee
another set of wheels built after summer.

Would like all black spokes and nipples, but it seems people reckon they scratch easy and look tatty
after a while?

Anyone have experience or advice on this set-up?


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 Post subject: Re: Wheel building guide
PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2014 3:10 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 10:33 pm
Posts: 2192
Location: Suffolk
Sound fine to me but you would use DT Swiss alpine triple spoke DS rear for the 2.34mm diamter eblow or Sapim race instead of comps and Sapim Strong single butted spokes DS rear. However inital thoughts should be fine.

Black spokes can scratch but if you take care of them they do ot look tatty either. If you neglet them like I do stick to silver.


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