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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:45 pm 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:36 am
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Location: High on a hill above the Somerset Levels...
Bit of an odd question, but bear with me here, I want to build a bike I can use on a sandy beach. Would studded snow tyres be best, or just fat DH type tyres? Or maybe even narrow slicks?? :shock:


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:51 pm 
Retro Guru
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Location: North West
I would have to say porcs - even if they are crap on sand they would leave the best tracks ! 8)

WD :D


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:53 pm 
Gold Trader
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Location: Gorleston-on-sea (If there is a bright center to the universe this is place furthest from it
I believe that the way to go is fat tyres and low pressures :wink:

I am also interested in the fattest standard tyres available as I am thinking along these lines too :D


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:55 pm 
Gold Trader
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Location: High on a hill above the Somerset Levels...
:D

You read my mind.... (both of you) It's just the budget is none existent and I happen to have some Tioga DH 2.1's in the workshop.... And a pair of slicks!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:31 pm 
Gold Trader / MacRetro rider
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Joined: Thu May 06, 2010 10:05 pm
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Location: Aberdeen
On firm/wet sand slicks actually work ok!, something with a tread will work better on the softer stuff, but if you hit the really dry sand then you may as well get off and walk.
A wider/fatter tyre should work best, it should give a bigger "footprint" and help stop you sinking into the sand.

My advice is stay on the wetter (ie firmer) sand, keep your pedalling action smooth, no sudden turns (unless you want to, just for fun :) ) and wash your bike down after each ride, the salt water and sand will rapidly wear out drivetrain parts otherwise, and check things like pedals and hubs regularly too, the sand gets everywhere...

Image


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:35 pm 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:36 am
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Location: High on a hill above the Somerset Levels...
Superb.... 8)

I was reckoning on using just about OK kit out of the spares box, so it can afford to be wrecked. Just the sandy dust off our local cycle track is bad enough, without the aid of salty water!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:28 am 
MacRetro rider
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 4:16 pm
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Using an on-one 456 or Inbred you can fit 24 x 3" DH tyres in the frame which equate to just shy of 26" wheels in diameter with wide 3" footprint. Result a pretty reasonable floatation tyred bike for considerably less than a fatbike. Alternatively fit as wide tyres as your frame/forks will take on as wide rims as you can get say 28mm jump bike rims. The wider the rim the lower the psi you'll get away with in your tyres and the bigger the footprint you can create thus increasing float.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 12:27 pm 
Gold Trader / MacRetro rider
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Joined: Thu May 06, 2010 10:05 pm
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Location: Aberdeen
velomaniac wrote:
. The wider the rim the lower the psi you'll get away with in your tyres and the bigger the footprint you can create thus increasing float.


I think he just wants to cycle along the beach, not cross the channel :lol:

You are right though, big volume tyres and low pressures should help.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 8:59 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2013 9:02 pm
Posts: 304
Location: Lancashire
I suppose it depends what type of sand you are riding over.
If it's like Ainsdale beach, rock hard, anything should do.
If the surface is dry or loose, then big tyres on low pressures are the key, as other people have already stated. Look at the type of extra wide rims and tyres that John Stamstad et. al. used on the Iditabike race in Alaska over snow and they should cope with soft sand, but I suppose there is a limit to what they can handle. I wouldn't recommend trying to ride over Morecambe's quicksands, no matter what kit you have! :wink:


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