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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 9:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 08, 2008 1:23 am
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Location: Edinburgh
Or are the rear drop-outs on newer bikes further apart?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 10:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2012 12:41 am
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I have experienced no issues (regarding use of spockets :) ) with all mentioned sprocket counts.
Just hubs need to be fitted with correct freehubs and chain has to be narrow-er for nine setup.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 10:20 pm 
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Location: Edinburgh
rider wrote:
I have experienced no issues (regarding use of spockets :) ) with all mentioned sprocket counts.
Just hubs need to be fitted with correct freehubs and chain has to be narrow-er for nine setup.


So do you need different chainrings with a narrower chain?


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2013 10:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2012 12:41 am
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konahed wrote:
So do you need different chainrings with a narrower chain?

No.
What You are building?


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 8:09 am 
National & North West AEC
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Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:43 am
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Location: Macclesfield Forest
Most bikes before about 1988 had a 130mm rear drop-out spacing while the move to 7 speed at around that time meant that most frames thereafter had 135mm spacing. This wider spacing remained the usual mountain bike standard for the next 20 years.
It's only recently that 150mm rear spacing has started to become common on modern bikes.

Anyway, as long as your bike has 135mm spacing then anything up to 10 speed will fit.

The next factor is the hub, or more specifically the freehub body. 7 speed bodies are narrower than the one used for 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes.

You can fit a 7 speed cassette on a freehub body designed for 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes using a spacer, but you can't fit anything other than a 7 speed cassette on a 7 speed freehub body. (except perhaps a 6 speed or single sprocket etc.)

With chains; 7 and 8 speed chains are the same width and can be used on 7 and 8 speed cassettes.
9 speed chains are narrower and can be used on 9 speed cassettes as well as 7 and 8 speed.
10 speed chains are narrower still and can only really be used on 10 speed cassettes.

Chainrings; despite being marked up as 8 speed, 9 speed or whatever, are generally compatible with any gearing set up.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 9:34 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 1:38 pm
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You can fit a 9 speed cassette on a 7 speed free hub body if you remove one sprocket- I.e you end up with an 8 speed block with nine speed spacing . I've done it on my mtb tandem...

Andy


quote="drystonepaul"]Most bikes before about 1988 had a 130mm rear drop-out spacing while the move to 7 speed at around that time meant that most frames thereafter had 135mm spacing. This wider spacing remained the usual mountain bike standard for the next 20 years.
It's only recently that 150mm rear spacing has started to become common on modern bikes.

Anyway, as long as your bike has 135mm spacing then anything up to 10 speed will fit.

The next factor is the hub, or more specifically the freehub body. 7 speed bodies are narrower than the one used for 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes.

You can fit a 7 speed cassette on a freehub body designed for 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes using a spacer, but you can't fit anything other than a 7 speed cassette on a 7 speed freehub body. (except perhaps a 6 speed or single sprocket etc.)

With chains; 7 and 8 speed chains are the same width and can be used on 7 and 8 speed cassettes.
9 speed chains are narrower and can be used on 9 speed cassettes as well as 7 and 8 speed.
10 speed chains are narrower still and can only really be used on 10 speed cassettes.

Chainrings; despite being marked up as 8 speed, 9 speed or whatever, are generally compatible with any gearing set up.[/quote]


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 9:52 am 
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Joined: Mon Sep 08, 2008 1:23 am
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Location: Edinburgh
Does that give faster changes?


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 10:15 am 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Sun Jun 22, 2008 1:38 pm
Posts: 1439
Location: OZ
konahed wrote:
Does that give faster changes?


All HG cassettes are pretty much equal in shift quality regardless of how many cogs

What it does give you is a choice of more ratios...

You would need 9 speed shifters tho..

Andy

p.s- Go see Steve at the Bike Station and tell him i sent you- he'll sort you out :-)


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 3:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:07 pm
Posts: 1319
Change the freehub body,7 speed is too narrow.I recently successfully changed a `91 105 eqipped bike to 8 speed.


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