Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sat Dec 10, 2016 10:27 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Newbie
PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 7:13 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:54 pm
Posts: 11
Hi there,
just joined after spending some time reading the really interesting and helpful posts. Myself and my kids, (girl and boy aged 14 and 11) live close to the Peak District but spend a lot of weekends in the Yorkshire Dales on the tracks in the three peaks area. I have a Scott Peak which is a 1999 or 2000 model (bit new for here I believe?) but have been looking for a full size mtb for my daughter who has outgrown the 24" wheel bike she has been using for the last year or so. I was looking at a 1993 Kona Cindercone but missed out on it on ebay but todaysaw an advert for a mid to late 90's Marin Bolinas Ridge. Went to see it and it was in truly time warp condition. If someone said it had been wheeled out of the shop and covered 5 miles I would have readily believed them. Not a mark on it. Anyway did not even haggle the price, just put my hand in my pocket. Its an 18.5" frame which may be a little too big for her at the moment (she has not ridden it yet as its part of her birthday pressie) but I rode it for a while today to check it out. Not the lightest bike (though not heavy either) but beautifully smooth and a joy to ride. It has brand new Specialized Hemisphere tyres on which are obviously more road oriented but coped ok on the easy track I took it down though will probably be swapped for something a bit more xc friendly. I loved the rigid front end and my mind is made up about the Scott now in that direction. It currently has an RST sus fork on which is like a pogo stick and weighs twice the weight of the frame (which is I think a very nice frame) so that is going in favour of lightness and simplicity. Any advice on converting back to rigid forks gratefully received. Anyway hello folks, cheers John.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Newbie
PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 1:34 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 12:53 pm
Posts: 137
Location: Great Britain
Hiya
You'll need to determine what length of fork travel your frame geometry was designed for. Turn of the century cross country frames came with suspension in the 65-80mm travel range, or thereabouts. Rigid forks with an axle to crown measurement of 410-420mm would probably work best. Both longer and shorter forks may have a tendency to upset the bike's handling.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Newbie
PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 5:20 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:54 pm
Posts: 11
Wow, I am going to have to digest that and get my rule out. I did not realise that it may be that precise but will do so and huge thanks for the advice. So much better than me just stumbling in and mucking it all up. Thanks again, John


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Newbie
PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2013 11:41 am 
National & North West AEC
National & North West AEC
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:43 am
Posts: 8146
Location: Macclesfield Forest
RST forks did tend to have a slightly longer A to C measurement than some other suspension forks. Even the ones with 80mm of travel could be as long as 440 - 450mm.

Have a check to see how the existing forks measure up. If it handles okay with the RST forks then try and find a similar length rigid fork. If the fork is a too long, and the head angle is too slack, then the steering will feel sluggish and heavy.
In which case a slightly shorter fork may be in order.

If it's a late 90's Marin then the frame is likely to have 'suspension corrected' geometry ie. it's designed to take a suspension fork.
So as previously stated a fork with an A to C measurement of around 410-420mm would be ideal.
For reference, earlier fully rigid bikes were usually designed around a rigid fork with an A to C of circa 390mm.

You will also need to make sure the steerer tube of any replacement fork is long enough too.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Newbie
PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2013 12:05 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:54 pm
Posts: 11
Hi there Paul,
the rigid fork is going on my Scott which still had the suspenion fork it left the factory with. All the reviews of the model that I have read rave about the frame (and I do like it) but complain about the fork not being to the same standard. After riding the Marin which I have got for my daughter (which left the factory with a rigid fork) I am convinced that a rigid on the Scott is the way to go. We do ride on some quite rough trails but not really full on so I think the extra discomfort of a rigid may well be outweighed by the lighter weight and easier climbing ability. I will get out the ruler to check the distances axle to crown. I have now got hold of a rigid fork which I know has a long enough stem and will need cutting down so its just a matter of suck it and see now. Has anyone else on here owned or ridden a Marin Bolinas of that era and if so what are your thoughts on the general quality and ride of the bike? Cheers John.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: mnsport, Mugoftea, stuey and 52 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group