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PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 8:20 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 9:25 pm
Posts: 825
strip everything out and start from scratch, replace all the seized parts, re paint, rust treat, re build, you'll have the bike for another 20


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 9:27 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:37 am
Posts: 3976
my option would be to spend the money on a different bike and hang it up. commuting kills bikes.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 6:18 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:04 pm
Posts: 2501
Location: West Sussex
jamabikes wrote:
commuting kills bikes.

But if you have lots you can take a different one each day and spread the wear... :D


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 6:43 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 8:48 pm
Posts: 298
drystonepaul wrote:
In my opinion most bikes are worth rescuing to some degree. Often though it's not really cost effective to completely restore them to mint condition.
While most things are fixable given enough time, effort and money, it's also an option to keep the patina and halt any further deterioration. There's a whole spectrum of approaches in between.

I'm also not really a fan of modernising old bikes, I'd prefer to keep their character and characteristics.
If you want modern features and components then get a modern bike.


I've always thought that steel framed 90's Kona would be fantastic with modern components as you can't buy a current steel Kona frame, unless you're happy with something that's around 30lb stock.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 12, 2013 8:33 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2012 2:26 am
Posts: 710
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Yes do it! Perhaps you'll find some inspiration here:
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=265433


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 10:41 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 1:16 pm
Posts: 4340
jamabikes wrote:
my option would be to spend the money on a different bike and hang it up. commuting kills bikes.


Communting only kills bikes if you don't look after them properly. They need proper cleaning and lubing every week and the kit needs to be durable much like any bike (or car for that matter). My 96 CC frame has been going strong for over 2 years now.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 15, 2013 6:56 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Joined: Fri May 03, 2013 6:56 pm
Posts: 16
Well seeing as I have been on e-bay and having started buying bits I guess I've decided. When I bought the frame I thought I was getting the orange one (92-93) but ended up with the new colour, slate grey. I think I'll try and get it painted in the orange. Does anyone know how I can find out the correct colour? I have had a frame restorer recommended to me in Rotherham (I think) he might know but I'd like to be sure.

A colleague of mine has a collection of Girvin forks and spares, they looked soooo cool at the time. I stuck with rigid forks until I moved on the a Whyte PRST-1 with a similar fork design.

It was the commuting that did for the frame, I had been mountain biking on it for seven years without so much as a spot of rust but then a year of commuting made a real mess.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2015 10:30 am 
Dirt Disciple
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Joined: Fri May 03, 2013 6:56 pm
Posts: 16
An old post revived!
I've done it up. Got it resprayed in metal flake black (nice) added some (modern) red hope quick releases to complement the red bars, sourced some nice period XT kit and a brand new Deore crankset with external bearings (at £50 I couldn't say no), some new hand built wheels with modern commuter style tyres, a silver Thomson seat post to match the silver original stem and red and black Charge Spoon seat to finish it off. So it's not original but it's been saved and rides as well as it ever did and is now my daily ride. On I forgot, Paul's component cantis in black and I spent an age stripping and polishing the rear brake booster so that is silver now too.

P.s. the seat post was melted out in the end! It took me an age to clean up the seat tube with files and grinding paperr to get it back to a good condition to take the new post.
P.p.s I'll post some pics at some point.
P.p.p.s. The headset still works loose, same was it always did.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2015 10:43 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2015 5:32 pm
Posts: 922
Location: The Wirral Peninsular
Great to hear :)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2015 11:29 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8220
Location: New Forest, UK
If you are commuting, the biggest single thing to help keep the bike in good condition is a set of mudguards. It keeps much of the bike clean of salt, especially the headset and seat tube / seatpost.
You also don't arrive looking and feeling like a swamp thing.

I would probably run a commuter as a singlespeed for simplicity's sake but that depends hugely on where you live, and how far you intend to ride - it wouldn't be much fun in Sheffield or Bath.


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