Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sun Dec 11, 2016 11:39 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 9:43 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 9:29 pm
Posts: 1770
Location: yorkshireland
This was dreamed up over a few drinkies at Fannys ale house one evening, one too many grim days had been spent with blistered hands trying to tease out posts from customers un loved bikes. My good friend took the beer mat scribblings home to sheffield with him and set to work in his free time in the engineering department. The main bar was turned down out of a stainless rod and about 10mm sliced off down its length. The bit that took forever im told was cutting the groove where the blade fits, I think he had a cnc machine running up and down it all day. Lil 4mm grub screws allow you to precisely set the depth of the blade so you can merrily saw away without worrying about slicing the frame to bits. The tool works best when cutting on the backstroke, the arm piece means you can apply constant pressure via the forearm to the leading edge of the blade without knackering your wrists.
Generally a nice lightweight pin will come out with a single cut, a thick walled pin will often need to have a segment removed but it can swing either way.
The pin shown had about 250mm stuck inside the frame and as you can see was well and truly corroded into place. This one took an hour and 15 minutes to remove, it is the longest pin I have attempted and as you can see it came out nice and cleanly. The mark you see on the frame is less than 1 10th of a mm deep, more of a scratch really.
I still dont jump for joy when I have to use this but it doesn't spoil my whole day like it once did.
Any royalties from copycat designs should go to my old amigo mr Chappell, he is a wizard amongst men.


Attachments:
t5.jpg
t5.jpg [ 82.51 KiB | Viewed 1017 times ]
t4.jpg
t4.jpg [ 119.09 KiB | Viewed 1017 times ]
t3.jpg
t3.jpg [ 125.44 KiB | Viewed 1017 times ]
t2.jpg
t2.jpg [ 144.88 KiB | Viewed 1017 times ]
t1.jpg
t1.jpg [ 128.05 KiB | Viewed 1017 times ]


Last edited by futuristicoldman on Thu Aug 01, 2013 8:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 9:47 pm 
Retro Guru
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 19, 2008 4:37 pm
Posts: 5198
Location: North West
Thats's a good idea 8)

I might need something like that soon :-(

Dads post - Ti frame / Factory fitted ally shim / carbon post ...

WD :D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 9:49 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Jul 05, 2011 8:42 pm
Posts: 3196
Nice that, how did you make it? I need one


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:16 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:27 pm
Posts: 205
That's great innit!


Did it with a screwdriver and a lump hammer today :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 11:11 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 17, 2010 7:19 pm
Posts: 3093
Location: Runcorn, cheshire.
Genius, get a patent then get on dragons den.
Good work.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 11:16 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 4:39 pm
Posts: 1455
love it!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 9:29 am 
National & North West AEC
National & North West AEC
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:43 am
Posts: 8146
Location: Macclesfield Forest
That looks like a great tool to have.

I would very much like to see how you made it and what you used.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 9:34 am 
MacRetro rider
MacRetro rider

Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 4:16 pm
Posts: 8661
Thats just a hacksaw blade clamped by screws into a piece of alloy rod. So simple yet not thought of until now. Genius !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mind you, I suspect splitting the rod or cutting a groove acurately down its length without a decent bench power saw would be even more difficult than removing the post without this tool. Maybe replace rod with a couple of strips of alloy flat plate to make it easier.

Still genius though :D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 12:48 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:25 pm
Posts: 1787
Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
Great tool. Interestingly though, how can a fairly "new" anodized post be stuck like that? Is it me or does that look like a thread lock compound on the post?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 6:40 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 9:29 pm
Posts: 1770
Location: yorkshireland
Woz wrote:
Great tool. Interestingly though, how can a fairly "new" anodized post be stuck like that? Is it me or does that look like a thread lock compound on the post?


Thats what the roads are paved with in this neck of the woods.....salt and lots of it!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: al-onestare, foz, IHateRain, MSNbot Media and 27 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group