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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 10:53 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8220
Location: New Forest, UK
Bike tents are very clever, but all you are saving is the weight of a pole, so why bother? You have the considerable disadvantage that you cannot leave the thing pitched if you ride off...

A cheaper alternative, high quality tent of the same weight, bigger and doubtless more wind resistant:
http://www.simplyhike.co.uk/products/Wi ... 1Tent.aspx

Or what I use:
http://www.surfmountain.com/Models.aspx ... tedKingdom
Which is 50 quid cheaper than the Topeak and more solidly built.


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 12:20 pm 
Windmilling for a Scotch Egg
Windmilling for a Scotch Egg
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Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2011 10:27 am
Posts: 4840
Location: Huddersfield, West Yorkshire
Going back to OP, I think some are forgetting that this will be his first "tour". If you are going to a popular area then I can't see the advantage of camping if you don't have any camping gear suitable.

If you make the first one you try as fun as possible then you'll get to know whether you like the touring idea without a big outlay on stuff you might not need again. Having as little weight on the bike will keep decent handling and it will be easier to ride a longer distance. A stop in a B+B will be great recuperation for the second day, especially important if a first time tour as riding a long distance on a second day might be a new (read difficult!) experience. A nice bumper breakfast will fuel you up for the day too. One night in a B+B won't be much more than a camping pitch plus the breakfast you'll have to buy.

If you catch the bug you can build up kit and knowledge on what you like to pack, how long to ride etc on every tour you do. You might eventually graduate to fully loaded touring accross deserts!!

I'm planning on doing the C2C this year and that'll be 50-60 miles a day over 3 days. As its my first multiday ride I'm going for a B+B for 2 nights as it'll only cost £80 ish in total and make it much more pleasurable. I'll be able to travel very very light to make it feel more like a day ride.


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 12:45 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8220
Location: New Forest, UK
Definitely agree Rob - camping touring is harder - you have more stuff to take, so you ride slower. Speaking personally 60 miles is comfortable on-road daily, probably more like 40 miles off-road (depending on terrain) with a camping load.

If you haven't toured, then B&Bing is the way to start, then add in camping later.


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 9:03 pm 
Lincs, East and South Yorks Deputy AEC
Lincs, East and South Yorks Deputy AEC
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Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2012 11:56 am
Posts: 1496
Location: Doncaster
Ok, all feedback digested. It's still going to be a camping trip as that was my original plan. I have three other interested Retro parties already so it's all looking good so far.

My personal challenge is to do this for as little outlay as possible so here's a little taster.

The bike, 1988 Specialized Rockhopper bought for £40, pannier set was £8.50, very close to being ready for the mini Retro tour. I'll also cover in this post the full inventory of all kit used for the mini tour, tent, sleeping bag, cooker etc.

I have removed most standard parts and replaced them with stronger / lighter components where possible:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 9:58 pm 
National & North West AEC
National & North West AEC
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Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:43 am
Posts: 8146
Location: Macclesfield Forest
For a single night then it's obviously worth considering the pros and cons of camping, but there is a very satisfying feeling about pitching up after a day in the saddle.
You generally don't get the sense of freedom in most of the UK that you'll get on the continent and in Scotland, due to the fact you often have to book ahead when camping in this country.
It can also be disproportionately expensive to camp here too.

Anyway, the Coleman tent you are looking at will be more than adequate, although a little heavy in my opinion. I have a lovely Terra Nova tent which is bigger than that one and weighs just 1kg. It did cost six times as much though.
I did also pick up a Coleman one man tent a few years ago for £60, which looks about the same size as the one you are looking at. It's a single skin tent though and weighs just under 900 grammes. Good quality and fine for a single night, but you get fed up of the condensation build up the second time you sit up and get an inpromptu face wash.

Avoid those 'clever' tents which use you bike instead of tent poles. They are heavy, expensive and they leak.

For the ultimate lightweight option, just get a lightweight nylon tarp, some para cord and make a bivvy shelter between a couple of trees.

The thing about bike camping is you take as much kit for one night as you would do for several weeks.

There's a good thread on touring here: --> viewtopic.php?f=1&t=90767
It also features my tried and tested touring kit list which I've included below...

drystonepaul wrote:
Touring Kit

Luggage:
Ortlieb Back Roller Plus panniers (40 litres pair)
Ortlieb Compact 5 bar bag (5 litres)
Ortlieb dry bag (13 litres)
Ortlieb dry bag (5 litres for quick access food. Doubles up as water carrier/washing bowl if needed)
Custom made bungee straps

Tent:
Terra Nova Laser (1kg)

Sleeping:
Khyham 800 sleeping bag (synthetic)
Therm-a-rest Lite3 short
Outwell Inflatable pillow

Cooking:
MSR Windpro stove with small gas bottle
1 litre stainless steel pot
0.6 litre Triangia kettle
Coffee percolator
Light my Fire plastic bowl kit with plastic spork
Titanium Spork
Matches/Lighter

0.8 litre water bottle and
Camelbak (3 litre bladder strapped to pannier or worn. Can also be used as a shower)

Clothes – base layers (Warm conditions):
2 short sleeve jerseys (one merino – one synthetic)
2 pairs lycra shorts
1 pair ¾ lycra bib knickers

Clothes – mid layers (Cold conditions):
1 Long sleeve jersey (merino)
2 pair ¾ baggy shorts (Endura - for riding and/evenings)
Lycra thermal arm warmers
Lycra thermal leg warmers

Clothes – outer layers (Cold/Wet conditions):
Gilet
Lightweight pertex shower/windproof
Waterproof jacket
Waterproof trousers
Fleece (evening use)

Clothes – other:
Full finger gloves
Gel mitts
SPD riding shoes
2 pairs socks
2 pairs underpants (evening use)
Cotton T-shirt (evening use)
Sandals/Flip-flops

Bike maintenance essentials:
2 presta inner tubes
Blackburn Mammoth Mountain Pump
3 Tyre levers
Puncture repair kit
Chain lube

Tools and spares:
Park ASW-9 Folding Multi-tool
• 4mm, 5mm, and 6mm hex wrenches plus a Phillips and standard screwdriver

Topeak Alien 2 Folding Multi-tool
• 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 8mm Allen wrenches
• 8, 9 & 10mm hex bolt wrenches (each 2pcs)
• Mini pedal wrench
• Phillips and flat screw drivers
• Universal chain tool
• Spoke wrenches for 14g & 15g
• 2 tyre levers
• Stainless knife
• Bottle opener
• T25 Torx wrench for disc brakes
• 10mm Allen socket


Folding Pliers
• 2” Knife
• Metal file
• Philips and slot head screwdrivers


Spare bike parts
• Brake pads
• M5 and M6 bolts and washers
• Chain links
• Rear brake cable
• Rear gear cable
• 2 spokes
• 2 chain-ring bolts
• Zip-ties

First Aid:
Ortlieb first aid kit
• 10 x Plasters
• 2 x Large self-adhesive dressings
• 1 x 10cm x 10cm dressing
• 2 x medium gauze bandages
• 1 x large gauze bandage
• Roll of medical tape
• 2 x Tampons (for use as field dressings)
• 1 x Condom (used to protect large abrasion wounds)
• Elastoplast Second Skin liquid dressing (Surgical glue)

Nail Scissors
Sam Splint
Foil survival blanket

Wash Kit: (all items travel size)
Deodorant
Shampoo
Conditioner
Original Source Mint shower gel
Anti bacterial shower gel/fabric cleaner
Toothpaste
Toothbrush
Travel towel
Wet wipes
Tissues

Medicines, Vitamins & Supplements
Ventolin inhaler (with spare gas)
Ibuprofen gel and tablets
Multibionta
Cod Liver Oil and Glucosamine Sulphate
Iron
Echinacea
Rehydration Sachets
Vaseline
Assos Chamoise Creme (Minty Arse Lard)
Sudocreme
Anusol (because you never know)
Tea-Tree Oil
Factor 30 sun block

Personal items & Other Stuff:
Passport
Maps
Compass
Digital Camera
Cash & credit cards
MP3 Player
Spare batteries
Mobile phone
Energy Gels (emergency use)
Front Cateye LED light
Rear Cateye LED light
Petzl Tikka Plus headtorch
Backupz red LED light
Zip-lock plastic bags


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 9:56 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8220
Location: New Forest, UK
Which Terra Nova tent do you have? My Voyager is up for replacement, but I am worried the lightweight versions around now are too fragile. What's your experience?


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 10:25 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu May 03, 2012 7:13 pm
Posts: 2574
Location: The Cock Inn, Tillett, Herts
You fitting mudguards for the tour?


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 11:10 am 
Lincs, East and South Yorks Deputy AEC
Lincs, East and South Yorks Deputy AEC
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Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2012 11:56 am
Posts: 1496
Location: Doncaster
Chopper1192 wrote:
You fitting mudguards for the tour?


I Wanted to but they ain't cheap. I can't seem to find a pair of suitable 26" mudguards anywhere, even Ebay is letting me down.....

Anyone have any suggestions?


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 12:06 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8220
Location: New Forest, UK
Your bike looks fine. I toured the Pacific Coast of the USA on a 1990 Marin Palisades, completely stock except for a pair of Mavic 231s on LX hubs an LX rear mech and bar-ends.
My kit was 13kgs, with tent and cooking gear split between two.


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 Post subject: Re: Retro MTB Touring.
PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 12:09 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu May 03, 2012 7:13 pm
Posts: 2574
Location: The Cock Inn, Tillett, Herts
251249396768 in 26" size will do the job nicely. Not a purpose built touring or trekking guard, but a reasonable price and should fit nicely and give a fair tyre clearance. I looked at these for the expedition bike I'm building but in the end I found enough odd single guards in my Fobidden Box Of Mystery to cobble together a workable pair.


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