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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 3:03 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:26 pm
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Location: 54 Festive Road Winchcombe GLOUCS Yarp...
Hi all,

Just changed chain and should change he original rear 8 speed cassette on my 1997 muddy fox. Looking at available cassettes there seem to be lots of unexplained variables. HG41/50/51etc Have read up and am wondering how hard it is to do the job as my Haynes bike book says hardest job in their view?

Also will any universal tool do it or is it one specific one for each of above?

Would appreciate advice in which to buy as amazon seems good value/choice. Thanks in advance.

Yes I know, but I'm getting old...... :facepalm:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 3:15 pm 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 2:30 pm
Posts: 12401
Location: Surrey
Not sure how this can be considered difficult at all. You need a chain whip and a cassette tool. Take wheel off bike, remove qr, for cassette tool through axle and I to the cassette lockring splines, wrap chain whip around the cassette cogs (there is a right way around, you need to be able to hold the cassette still with the chain whip whist unscrewing the cassette with the cassette tool), use the cassette tool to unscrew the lockring. Job done.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 3:27 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:38 am
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Location: Norfolkshire
Exactly as ishaw says, just to add if you need tools or parts just search ebay, you will get some bargains and you will soon be up and running, or find a LBS and see what they have, I got a chain whip and cassette tool fairly cheap. :)

Its really not to difficult just remember it unscrews opposite to the drive hence why you need a chainwhip to hold it whilst you undo the locking ring :) and watch for your knuckles take your time and its easy enough.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 3:33 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8202
Location: New Forest, UK
As to selecting the cassette, most of the differences are marketing puff. The top-end ones are marginally lighter but can be more fragile. They all seem to shift equally well. I tend to go with midrange SRAM cassettes.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 4:03 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:26 pm
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Location: 54 Festive Road Winchcombe GLOUCS Yarp...
Thank you to all. Is a chain whip same as an old oil filter thing with a chain on it as I've got one of them somewhere..?
Just been out counting and my current one is 11/28 and says shimano hg hyperglide c lock 40 nm so presumably I need to torque it when fitting?

Apologies if I'm being a bi of a wimp but bike book gives it 5 spanners :oops:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 4:52 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:26 pm
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Location: 54 Festive Road Winchcombe GLOUCS Yarp...
Searching for "chain whip" brings up some interesting and varied results! :D

So is hg41 middle quality?


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 5:04 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader

Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 9:48 am
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Location: Bristle
it's the same concept as an oil filter wrench, but generally a bit tougher

I use SRAM Pg850. better quality than HG50 and no more expensive


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 6:13 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 9:06 pm
Posts: 4424
Location: Herts UK
you don't need a chain whip - I use a short length of old chain, wrapped round the smallest sprocket and then use a pair of water pump pliers to hold the sprocket from moving - the chain is there to protect the sprocket's teeth.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 6:33 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 2:30 pm
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Location: Surrey
Right tools for the job is always best, though if you have work-arounds available then of course they can work too.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 12, 2013 7:42 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
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Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
You can pick up a decent SRAM and whip from CRC for a pittance.


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