Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sun Dec 11, 2016 1:32 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 7:07 pm 
Gold Trader / MacRetro rider
Gold Trader / MacRetro rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2006 1:03 pm
Posts: 11798
Location: Returning
You can buy a die from Tracy tools for about £18


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 7:15 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 30, 2012 9:02 pm
Posts: 1180
Location: In the Garage in Somerset
mikee wrote:
You can buy a die from Tracy tools for about £18


Fine for cleaning out existing threads, but man! that would take a lot of effort to cut new ones! :shock:

Plus getting it square and starting it off would be fun :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Mar 05, 2013 9:39 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:04 pm
Posts: 2501
Location: West Sussex
Stupid question but how were they cut originally ?
Was it done in the factory or would the bike shops have been
equipped BITD ?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 10:42 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
Posts: 2386
MADJEZ wrote:
Stupid question but how were they cut originally ?
Was it done in the factory or would the bike shops have been
equipped BITD ?
Usually in the factory, with a big tool (special machine tool in the bigger factories, hand tool in smaller frame builders).
BITD a good number of shops would have also had the tool, or a cheap "non-factory" version of it) along with cutters/tools to do a good number of basic frame repairs. (Straightening and thread tapping mostly).
Since the event of the aheadset, most shops now just carry a steerer cutting guide, and a hacksaw.
And most modern frames can't be cold set easily, or at all, and retapping stripped threads in aluminium is a world of pain, and regularly unsuccessful!

So we end up with a handful of specialists, and most shops simply can't do the job.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 5:47 pm 
Old School Hero
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 11:24 pm
Posts: 191
Location: Netherlands
^ that, but beware that also many steerer threads were 'rolled' instead of cut. A high end threaded steel steerer used thin high tensile hardened steel. Some you simply could not cut, because it was to brittle and pieces would shatter of leaving anything but thread behind.
Suspension forks spring to mind. That's why they had exchangeable steerer tubes, so you could fit different lengths (next to all the different 1", 1.1/8", 1.1/4" diameters).


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: marxman0562, Retromike, shaggy and 39 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group