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 Post subject: retro cut off point
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 12:44 pm 
NE, North and West Yorks Deputy AEC
NE, North and West Yorks Deputy AEC
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Joined: Mon Jul 05, 2010 8:39 pm
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Location: Wakefield
Thinking of 2013 would a 1997 Marin bobcat trail with v brakes be classed as retro, it does have some 1999, shimano 9 speed parts as well, I know 97 is generally the cut of point, would this change over the years ?

I want to attend every national ride in 2013 and don't want to loose points turning up with this build

Have I opened a can of worms :oops: :oops:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 12:57 pm 
retrobike rider
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Location: Yorkshire, England
People class my Kona as retro, 1997 frame, has newer era and similar bits on it. I think of it as modern even the frame itself.

Don't think we had points this year to 'loose' or gain like the year just gone (2012) before. So nothing to worry about other than being shunned by your peers ;-)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:51 pm 
retrobike rider
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Location: Leeds, for ages!
i reckon it is safe as retro :wink: i hope so as my soon to be revealed DBR axis '97 will be left out for the poy-keys.

some more modern components are often introduced for practicality sake as, some older kit has simply expired or too expensive to get hold of to justify the build.

i hear the point though. cut off for '97 for retro status is safe for many years to come as there is loads bikes and parts from pre '97 still out there. should that not be the case then, movement of the cut-off point may have to shift up a bit to ensure we all have enough material to work with.

:D


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 Post subject: Re: retro cut off point
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:58 pm 
BoTM Winner / Gold Trader
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slmracing wrote:
I want to attend every national ride in 2013 and don't want to loose points turning up with this build



There is no "points" system in place. The people who show up with pre 98 bikes equipped w. V brakes do have to bring the beer, however.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 2:49 pm 
National & North West AEC
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Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 12:43 am
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Location: Macclesfield Forest
In terms of the points awarded for attending the RB National ride series, you'd only lose points for riding something truly modern (or if you take things too seriously).
Most people will happily justify using a few period sympathetic modern parts like tyres, rims, chains, cassettes, chainrings and brake blocks, especially after the so called summer we had in the UK this year.

A 97 Marin would be fine. The most important thing about the series is coming along, riding an old bike and having some fun.

The 97 cut-off date is pretty well established on Retrobike based on a number of reasons including technology, change in market forces/niche bikes and the dawn of trail centres.
I can't see it changing.

It might be worth considering what the next phase could be called though...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 6:26 pm 
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There's a strong case for saying the real cut-off is "1998 Model Year" not "1997 Calendar Year".

A huge number of 1998 model year bikes ( sold from autumn 97 to summer 98 ) have identical frames and groupsets to 96/97 model year bikes.

It was the 1999 model year when Shimano overhauled all its groupsets, going 9 speed and ditching all traces of chrome for bulky matt-coloured stuff... Although, compared to what they and SRAM knock out now it doesn't look so bad :shock:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 6:35 pm 
retrobike rider
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lrh wrote:
There's a strong case for saying the real cut-off is "1998 Model Year" not "1997 Calendar Year".

A huge number of 1998 model year bikes ( sold from autumn 97 to summer 98 ) have identical frames and groupsets to 96/97 model year bikes.

It was the 1999 model year when Shimano overhauled all its groupsets, going 9 speed and ditching all traces of chrome for bulky matt-coloured stuff... Although, compared to what they and SRAM knock out now it doesn't look so bad :shock:


I believe that already is the general loose classification.

Remember one important thing though, it is more important to bring any bike, be it just about working or even modern, than in is to pike the ride (aka say your're coming and then not turn up)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:05 pm 
NE, North and West Yorks Deputy AEC
NE, North and West Yorks Deputy AEC
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Location: Wakefield
Cheers Guys the Marin is very original, I only went for the 9 speed deore drive chain because I had it all in stock and it stands me at nothing, I have kept all the original altus equipment but it is quite worn, Like Marc two tone says we have to stick to a budget, especially when you are running a fleet of bikes :D :D :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 11:59 am 
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Ride it and don't worry. Anything that's not contemporary is retro in my book :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 2:48 pm 
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Location: County Antrim
The retro cut-off date has been done to death on here but this is how I see it -

Old School: Pre 1990/91. Until around this time most bikes were quite similar and took inspiration from other bikes of the era - no suspension, 7 speed, U-brakes, long wheelbase, slack angles and tallish seat tubes etc.

Mid school: 1991 - 99. The introduction of the first 8 speed group, XTR, low profile cantis, Joe Murray inspired frame angles and then V brakes, the first DH specific bikes and a whole raft of different suspension designs and methods.

Modern: 2000 on. By this stage most of the advancements had been made and MTB's had developed into what we are still buying today. Hydraulic disc brakes, rear suspension became the norm, elastomers became obsolete and the 4-bar or single pivot design was now the way to go.

Nowadays we have 29ers with 10 speed and 760mm bars but the basic design has remained similar to what was available in the late 90's. In recent years we've had companies telling us we need 1 1/4 headtubes and press fit bb's, just like we had in the early 90's :roll:


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