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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 12:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:46 pm
Posts: 962
Location: Montpellier, France
I cycled around Europe in '92 on an Orange Clockwork. I chose it because it had all of the braze-ons I needed for racks and mudguards. Anything of that quality (butted steel tubes as opposed to hi-tensile steel) or above would be fine, I'm sure. The only other two bikes I considered at the time were a steel Trek (can't remember the model but it too had all the braze-ons) and a Dawes Galaxy, which I quite fancied but decided against simply because I could buy the Orange frame and build it up for less than the cost of the Dawes. Practically everyone recommends steel over aluminium.

The point Foz makes above about having a pump that works almost made me cry - I only had 2 punctures in 8 months but the second was while I was dashing for the ferry at Cherbourg: that was the point where I realised my pump no longer worked...

I was on roads only, no tracks or bad roads, other than in parts of central Italy. Make sure you know as much about bike maintenance as you can possibly learn. And keep an eye on your tyre sidewalls as well as the treads for wear - I woke up one morning to find I could see the inner tube through the sidewall.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:28 pm 
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:25 pm
Posts: 1785
Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
Marin Eldridge Grade. IMHO that's all they are good for - long distance abusive careless heavy touring. I also think they would make a suitable makeshift BBQ grill.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 4:11 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 2:12 pm
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Location: Yateley, Hants.
There is a steel Claudbutler cape wrath on ebay at the moment, lugged Reynolds 653 Magnum tubeset (531 main tubes and 753 stays) which might suit. I would have said an old Raleigh lightweight or Dawes would be a good bet they are proper old skool lugged steel and can be bent, brazed or welded back together if needed and are comfortable long distance.

Carl.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 6:09 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 21, 2009 3:53 pm
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Most decent early frames of steel will be okay. Treks being unpopular this side of the pond are excellent bikes to do touring with

Three main areas...a decent bottom bracket..un54 is bombproof. Decent quality steel or ali racks. I prefer steel myself. Wheels, often overlooked. Be prepared to pay for a handmade set for touring.

The exspense on the above three will seem high at the outset but I guarranty you these are the three main areas bikes fail on a long tour and every pound will be the best pounds spent


As mentioned the biggest decider on how the tour goes after the right bike..is your ability to maintain the bike, even more so in countries that may not have a bike on every corner. Replacing spokes, setting up brakes etc are good skills to learn

as to getting light parts..a waste, if the ride is weeks/months long you will lose the weight from your own body quick enough. Invest in strong and it won'tshouldn't let you down


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 7:44 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 12:28 pm
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Location: Almeria, Spain
Of course any steel Kona with P2s would fit the bill nicely.

It might upset the fashion police but Tioga power grips as bar ends give you three diferent hand positions, definately a help on a long day I've found.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:18 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 2:49 pm
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Location: Boiling in a Bivvy Bag
I disagree with the idea that most old steel frames will be fine, some have really thin stays and are hopelessly flexy when fully loaded - old MTBs don't automatically make good touring bikes as a lot of people think.
I'm not sure that everyone contributing to this thread has actually done much touring :wink:. Anyone who's ever experienced the terror of a loaded bike twisting and swaying on an alpine descent knows how vital a stable and stiff frame is.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:29 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2009 12:28 pm
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Location: Almeria, Spain
Heracy on this site I know, but what about a steel On-one?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:33 pm 
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ferrus wrote:
I disagree with the idea that most old steel frames will be fine, some have really thin stays and are hopelessly flexy when fully loaded - old MTBs don't automatically make good touring bikes as a lot of people think.
I'm not sure that everyone contributing to this thread has actually done much touring :wink:. Anyone who's ever experienced the terror of a loaded bike twisting and swaying on an alpine descent knows how vital a stable and stiff frame is.


I'm not sure someone read all the posts :lol: :P :lol:

sylus wrote:
Most decent early frames of steel will be okay.



This might give you some ideas

http://www.pbase.com/canyonlands/fullyloaded


Last edited by sylus on Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:37 pm 
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Location: Staffordshire
My old Saracen Kili Flier Comp is my choice. It is built like a tank and unusually for a Comp has all the required braze ons.

I am six feet tall and have two Saracens of the same size but from different years. The newer (1990) one has geometry and top tube length much more conducive to days in the saddle. The last thing you want is to end up with a sore neck due to being too stretched out. If it doesn't have front low rider mounts, consider the Limpet system.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 8:55 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 2:49 pm
Posts: 2578
Location: Boiling in a Bivvy Bag
sylus wrote:
ferrus wrote:
I disagree with the idea that most old steel frames will be fine, some have really thin stays and are hopelessly flexy when fully loaded - old MTBs don't automatically make good touring bikes as a lot of people think.
I'm not sure that everyone contributing to this thread has actually done much touring :wink:. Anyone who's ever experienced the terror of a loaded bike twisting and swaying on an alpine descent knows how vital a stable and stiff frame is.


I'm not sure someone read all the posts :lol: :P :lol:

sylus wrote:
Most decent early frames of steel will be okay.



This might give you some ideas

http://www.pbase.com/canyonlands/fullyloaded

Fair do's :) I wasn't specifically referring to your post fella, though it might have prompted the response.


Looking at the link, does any one else get a real buzz from looking at pic's of loaded bikes?

..but sad there's no love for BOB :(


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