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 Post subject: Braze on Cable guides
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 2:52 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:09 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Birmingham
Does anybody know where I can get hold of some braze on cable guides, the type which are most often used with a cable tie to secure brake lines these days?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 3:12 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2008 12:21 pm
Posts: 5782
Location: Lost in Translation
Ceeway have them (art.200 - cable tie guide):

http://www.framebuilding.com/Braze%20ons.htm


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 4:03 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:09 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Birmingham
Thanks, I'm new to this. Did stumble across their website but was put off as it looks very 'Retro'! I'll take another look.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 6:14 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:04 pm
Posts: 1799
Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
I can help you out with those...£2 each incl plastic clip and UK postage:
Image
The plastic clips are for 5mm hoses, but the steel saddle will take a zip tie if you run fat 6mm hoses, braided etc.

Ceeway are pretty retro, concentrating on steel parts, lugs etc. They've been around since it wasn't retro...:wink: but there is some nice modern stuff under What's New
Also have a look at Paragon Machineworks.

All the best,


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 6:42 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:09 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Birmingham
Hmm, they're what I want all right. Thanks. Before I go ahead and take the plunge, do you imagine I will have success silver soldering these on using a torch?

I'm thinking of using something like this;

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BRAZING-SOLDE ... 296wt_1067


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2012 7:28 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:04 pm
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Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
Yup, no problem doing small brazing and silver soldering with one of those.
You'd need something bigger (or hotter) for lugs etc, but propane's fine for braze ons.

Something like this
should do the job nicely, 660degrees, flux cleans off with hot water.

All the best,


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 9:22 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:09 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Birmingham
Great, thanks for the info. It puts my mind at ease to have a recommendation.

I need 13 guides! Seems like a lot but I counted 3 times. Can you do me a discount for bulk?!

Also, would something like this make a better long term investment in your opinion? Think it should create a bit more heat?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SIEVERT-PROPA ... 500wt_1067

Thanks again


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2012 8:21 pm 
retrobike rider
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Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
Sure, no problem for bulk...let's say £1.50 each + post. Should save about a tenner.

Silverline (the cheaper one) is probably OK for a small job, but personally I'd go for the Sievert torch for the extra cash. Swedish quality rather than the Chinese copy. They're top quality propane torches, and have great support and range of options (http://www.cupalloys.co.uk/heating-c107.html)

The 2941 burner's a pretty good small burner for braze-ons, you'd need something bigger for lugs etc, preferably one of their cyclone burners, which spin the flame to wrap it around the tube.
Also, an upgrade to the 3488 handle, with the cut-off pilot light trigger is well worth it.

Bigger burners aren't hotter, but you get more volume of heat...think Volts and Amps. You'd need to go to Oxy-propane or Oxy-Aetylene to get higher temperatures. It's much harder to screw thing up using propane, you work slower, and it's very hard to over cook the steel.

All the best,


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2012 9:13 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:09 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Birmingham
Thanks a lot for all this advice, you've given me plenty to consider.

I'll go for that deal, ta. I'll PM you regarding payment etc.

Thanks again

David


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2012 7:20 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:09 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Birmingham
Guides turned up today, great, ta very much. Now I've no excuses to not get on with it.


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