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PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2012 9:41 pm 
West Midlands Deputy AEC
West Midlands Deputy AEC
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Joined: Sun Oct 18, 2009 7:30 pm
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Location: Suffolk
Thanks for all the responses chaps - I'll try that place in Bristol :D


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 7:09 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:15 pm
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Just a heads up for anyone thinking of visiting the above company, whilst the name on the website is Reality Motorworks the sign as you go in is Griff's Motorcycle Services. I called by there earlier today and spent ages riding around the industrial estate before I figured out that they are the same company.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 9:12 pm 
Gold Trader / MacRetro rider
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Joined: Thu May 06, 2010 10:05 pm
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Tc wrote:
Got a quote to anodise a frame today from them £150!

Tc


Is that expensive for anodising a frame? I have a frame I'd like anodised again.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 6:31 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:07 pm
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Ive restored a few vintage motorcycles and dont sandblast anything pre powdercoating,as mentioned before bead blasting is the way to go.A few tips-itemise everything you hand to the blasters/coaters and mask off key areas ie threads and bearing surfaces etc otherwise you`ll be retapping out powdercoat that can break a tap in a second and scraping powdercoat off headtube bearing race areas.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 6:43 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
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nevadasmith wrote:
Thanks for all the responses chaps - I'll try that place in Bristol :D


Let me know what they harge to blast and coat a frame? Thanks


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 7:19 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:15 pm
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Rats I was down there earlier dropping off some fork lowers to be powder coated and would have asked if I'd known. With my fork lowers they're going to do a chemical strip and then a couple of other processes which I can't remember. Definitely not a quick media blast and respray kind of outfit.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 2013 2:21 am 
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66 triumph daytona wrote:
Ive restored a few vintage motorcycles and dont sandblast anything pre powdercoating,as mentioned before bead blasting is the way to go.


I would say the opposite, grit blast is perfect for pre powder blasting.
Why would you go with bead?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 9:28 am 
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integerspin wrote:
66 triumph daytona wrote:
Ive restored a few vintage motorcycles and dont sandblast anything pre powdercoating,as mentioned before bead blasting is the way to go.


I would say the opposite, grit blast is perfect for pre powder blasting.
Why would you go with bead?

Grit (sand)blasting is used for industrial applications such as gates,RSJ etc.Its an aggressive way to remove rust,weld slag and other contaminates pre galvanising or powdercoating,its finish is very rough and a lot of heat is generated from the process(so much so it can destroy and warp thin gauge sheet metal and softer metals like aluminium).Grit blasting is never used by classic car/motorcycle restorers due to this.Grit blasting also leaves residuals that are impossible to fully get rid of.Glass bead/vapour blasting is the preferred option.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 5:28 am 
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66 triumph daytona wrote:
Grit (sand)blasting is used for industrial applications such as gates,RSJ etc.Its an aggressive way to remove rust,weld slag and other contaminates pre galvanising or powdercoating,its finish is very rough and a lot of heat is generated from the process(so much so it can destroy and warp thin gauge sheet metal and softer metals like aluminium).Grit blasting is never used by classic car/motorcycle restorers due to this.Grit blasting also leaves residuals that are impossible to fully get rid of.Glass bead/vapour blasting is the preferred option.


I think you have chilled iron in mind, chilled iron is fantastic for heavy stuff but pretty much useless for light stuff and no good for aluminium even heavy aluminium parts. It has good cutting ability and plenty of mass.
When I say grit I mean aluminium oxide[basically hard sand], it cuts and leaves the
ideal surface for powder.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 12:15 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:07 pm
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integerspin wrote:
66 triumph daytona wrote:
Grit (sand)blasting is used for industrial applications such as gates,RSJ etc.Its an aggressive way to remove rust,weld slag and other contaminates pre galvanising or powdercoating,its finish is very rough and a lot of heat is generated from the process(so much so it can destroy and warp thin gauge sheet metal and softer metals like aluminium).Grit blasting is never used by classic car/motorcycle restorers due to this.Grit blasting also leaves residuals that are impossible to fully get rid of.Glass bead/vapour blasting is the preferred option.


I think you have chilled iron in mind, chilled iron is fantastic for heavy stuff but pretty much useless for light stuff and no good for aluminium even heavy aluminium parts. It has good cutting ability and plenty of mass.
When I say grit I mean aluminium oxide[basically hard sand], it cuts and leaves the
ideal surface for powder.

Nope,all grit media-walnut shells,iron etc are bad news for restoration.I cant think of a single car or motorcycle restorer that grit blasts,in fact the ideal method is a chemical strip.My first restoration was on a Norton and had the frame walnut shell blasted,never again,I was ages picking bits out of the swing arm pivot and headtube.My current Triumph had its components bead blasted and it was far easier with a better finish.If anyone wants 100% peace of mind they should consider cghemical stripping.


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