Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sat Dec 10, 2016 9:55 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 12:51 am 
Dirt Disciple
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:58 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Canada
Specialized owns the rights to the Horst Link.And FYI Horst Leitner invented the Horst Link. And Specialized,Ritchey,Fisher,Klein and GT get my votes with a special thanks to Intense for the M1
FRED101 wrote:
Unlike some retrobikers here i like full spuspension. In this category, i would point
1)The San andreas : still alive today as are so many of its nephews, how many "non classic" frame paterns can boast such a long life and descendence?
2) The Trek Y : Proof that NOT only good designs are copied
3) Whatever bike brand put the Horst link on the map for the masses (i let the purist discuss this topic) has to be credited for one of the best, most used and abused suspension design (the new virtual point suspension crop, just being a extreme use of that same four bar linkage patern), as a side note non horst link Turners are one of this sickest joke in the recent mtb history IMHO
That's all full sus for tonight, let's go back to rigid steel (steel is real, i sure agree)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 2:55 am 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 11:30 pm
Posts: 80
DM wrote:
Ritchey
Cunningham



Aaaah, Happy Days....
(sorry, couldn't resist that :oops: )


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 8:17 am 
Old School Hero
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:43 am
Posts: 162
Location: Belgium
Ken McGinn wrote:
Specialized owns the rights to the Horst Link.And FYI Horst Leitner invented the Horst Link. And Specialized,Ritchey,Fisher,Klein and GT get my votes with a special thanks to Intense for the M1
Quote:
If you stop there it's indeed clear and simple, it gets complicated when you go into details like the fact that specialized doesn't have the rignt for the whole world, Turner was a part in the development af the "horst link" and then went his own way, people like Ellsworth pretend to reinvent the wheel and managed to make another patent out of it etc, etc.
Looking at that list it appears that there's been nothing influential for about 15 years. Is this right - is it like music and we are now recycling and adapting older ideas without any true innovation?
Quote:
Iwill agree with this one, if we loook deep into the past we can for sure find examples of these innovations that are way older than we think (mostly in the motorcycle world for examlpe prallel forks etc etc.).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 2:35 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:26 pm
Posts: 3752
I would have to Say Raleigh....... Back in the late 80's as the 1st bikes were availble and affordable for me as a teenager, I remeber having a raleigh maverick in grey with 15 gears, cantilver brakes and central ridge tyres. If it wasnt for these I wouldnt have upgraded to Specialized, Diamond back and Kona ! and possibly be riding today


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 7:46 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:29 pm
Posts: 389
Giant Cadex, Trek OCLV, both brought carbon fibre to the masses in lugged and monocoque form,


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 11:44 am 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2005 12:28 pm
Posts: 1676
Location: Derbyshire
Fascinating thread, especially reading through and reading what people classify as influential.
Influential bikes influence for all manner of reasons:

Influence people to get out and ride: In the UK the early muddy fox bikes certainly did that and put MTBing on the popular / "fashionable" map.

Influence the industry and bike design:
The early repak bikes set the basic evolutionary starting point that's still there today.
The RC100 showed that tubes didn't have to be round
The Cunningham bikes showed you could bolt things together
Cannondale & Klein showed you could use larger diameter tubes & aluminium to reduce weight (and the latter how to use a paint scheme to sell a bike!)
Ritchey showed what you could do with a steel tubeset
Kestrel showed you could use CF effectively
Bontrager applied some real science to the engineering and compensation needed in the frame design
Mtn cycles, Offroad & Boulder bikes pushed the early suspension curves down different paths.

Probably lots more if I think harder about this.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 1:13 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2007 5:52 pm
Posts: 29
most influential bikes EVER?

Micheaux Velocipede - the first proper bicycle.

Starley's Rover Safety of 1885 - the first successful modern safety bicycle.

Edlin and Sinclair's 1888 redesign of the Safety to accommodate the pneumatic tyre


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:20 pm 
Dirt Disciple
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:58 pm
Posts: 38
Location: Canada
The Hobby Horse was the start.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:33 pm 
Gold Trader
Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 11:14 pm
Posts: 3855
Location: Somerset
Mine, 'cos it makes me want to ride! :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:35 pm 
Gold Trader
Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 29, 2006 11:14 pm
Posts: 3855
Location: Somerset
hilldodger wrote:
most influential bikes EVER?

Micheaux Velocipede - the first proper bicycle.

Starley's Rover Safety of 1885 - the first successful modern safety bicycle.

Edlin and Sinclair's 1888 redesign of the Safety to accommodate the pneumatic tyre


Imagine if the Rover Safety bicycle had come 90years too late...

The British Leyland Safety bicycle.

We would all be on German made penny farthings. :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: caemis, ringo, Yahoo [Bot] and 40 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group