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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 5:54 pm 
East Midlands AEC
East Midlands AEC
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Joined: Thu Oct 05, 2006 7:45 pm
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Location: Derby, UK
I have a new steerer for my AMP fork. Managed ot get the old one out (with a bit of erm...gentle persuasion :roll: ). However I am struggling to get the new one in. AMP said you need a hyraulic press. I don't have one of them on my multi-tool. I have managed to get it some of the way but have an inch to go (the hardest bit!).

My question is: given that both crown and steerer are aluminium, would freezing them before pushing it in make the job easier? Will it make the slightest difference?


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:02 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2007 3:31 pm
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Location: Leeds
I'm not an expert on this, but I'd be very careful about how much percussive encouragement you give it to get the steerer in properly. Anywhere aluminium is involved I don't like the idea of exposing it to the high stress of, say, a hammer blow or the like. Steel will accept that kinda treatment a little better than aluminium

Can't you fashion togther a press using a decent quality bench vice ? You might need to make some wooden supports to hold the aluminium crown & steerer tube so that the vice is not directly pressing against the metal of the forks?

If in doubt get it done by a professional / the manufacturer, especially a part as structurally vital as a fork crown!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:11 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Personally i wouldn't use the old crown with a new steerer. Press-fit steerers/crowns are assembled new, how do you know you haven't affected the crown by removing the old steerer?

I'd be concerned about them parting company, most likely when taking off/landing something big :(


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:26 pm 
Retro Guru
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personally i would nip to my local garage and ask them to press it in with a proper press and bung em a tenner.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:34 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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You could always try a local engineering firm and see if they have a fly press, they have a very handy hole through the middle, long stroke and forks fit pretty well.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:37 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Or get yourself one!


http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Edwards-fly-press ... dZViewItem


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:43 pm 
East Midlands AEC
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Location: Derby, UK
thanks for advice! Not worried about old crown/new steerer as AMP crown is solid lump of aluminium and I haven't damaged it (although I guess it maybe unseen) - also it's only going to have light duties anyway on the commute to work on my Technium. Won't ever go off road.

Quote:
:shock:


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 6:57 pm 
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Arrrrghhhhh!
I could go on for hours about this, but I wont.
In a nutshell, you need a hydraulic press and someone who knows how to assemble aluminium components together. Alu on alu picks up in close fit situations, ie the surfaces on each end up biting into each other and they become seized, hence why unanodised seatposts get stuck in alu frames.
A fly press is no good either, they are only useful for shocking things or punching. You will never do it with a hammer either.
Send the crown and steerer to me and I will do it for you.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 7:34 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Location: Portsmouth
Could also go on for hours, a fly press does work. A hydraulic press is better IF it is set up right but could do way more damage. We have used fly presses to swage very high tolerance parts together for tank transmissions. Not a punching and quite a long push.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 08, 2007 7:51 pm 
Retro Guru
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I have an FJ Edwards fly press and a 30t hydraulic press. I have never found an engineering related task that would merit the use of a fly press in preference to a hydraulic, not in my job anyway. I realise that they do have there uses though, perfect for stamping your name into apprentice training tools and I have stamped out many a rubber washer using one!
For the original problem of pressing a steerer into a crown, a hydraulic press is the best tool for the job.


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