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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 7:56 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Sat May 09, 2009 11:46 pm
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Location: East Riding of Yorkshire
M-Power wrote:
Beauty.... more pics please. Need a close up of that lugwork 8) Most frames were fillet brazed back in 82 or earlier. Parts were a right mix from different manufacturers and the seatposts were too short resulting in crazy frame sizes to our eyes today.

Yes please....Pics of any French classic Motobecanes if they exist or a 1st Gen Specialized :roll:


Thank you. The quality of the frameset and the original Suzue/Araya wheels always strikes me as really good - I'm not sure whether that's due to the era or the specific bike:

There are more pics on page 5 of my build thread:
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=236636&start=40

Image


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 9:52 pm 
GOLD | PoTM | Rider | rBOTM
GOLD | PoTM | Rider | rBOTM
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:26 pm
Posts: 23097
Location: 54 Festive Road Winchcombe GLOUCS Yarp...
My Andy Powell only misses the saddle (which I sold to Danson for his) and bars. Same era as mr Kawasaki’s


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:50 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:01 pm
Posts: 4848
kingoffootball wrote:
M-Power wrote:
Beauty.... more pics please. Need a close up of that lugwork 8) Most frames were fillet brazed back in 82 or earlier. Parts were a right mix from different manufacturers and the seatposts were too short resulting in crazy frame sizes to our eyes today.

Yes please....Pics of any French classic Motobecanes if they exist or a 1st Gen Specialized :roll:


Thank you. The quality of the frameset and the original Suzue/Araya wheels always strikes me as really good - I'm not sure whether that's due to the era or the specific bike:

There are more pics on page 5 of my build thread:
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=236636&start=40

Image


Amazing looking bike, love the lugs, the forks, the handlebar is sick and Tange tubing 8) and all made in the same factory as the first Specialized bike - amazing. The quality if these first production bikes is something. Must have taken a much longer time to make by hand, like the fillet brazed frames of the era.


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Last edited by M-Power on Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:54 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2018 3:43 pm
Posts: 257
Location: Cambridgeshire - flatlands (the horror, the horror)
Gosh I remember those Suntour shifters - I had them on my Dawes Ranger - tighten or loosen using the wire handle to increase or decrease the friction in the system....


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 4:59 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 11:55 pm
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Location: The mountains of Northants
Just got back home, so dug the S&G out for a photo.
Attachment:
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:42 am 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
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Joined: Tue Sep 30, 2008 6:25 pm
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Location: Near Wendover Bucks
The man who introduced US style mountain biking into the UK was a London Evening Standard journalist called Richard Grant. He is probably best known for his collaboration with cycling journalist Richard Ballantine that created Richards' Bicycle books.

In 1977 Richard Grant was visiting California looking for good stories for the Evening Standard when he heard about Gary Fisher and Charlie Kelly. He sought them out; went riding with them and thought that 'this was the most fun you could have on a bicycle'. He then bought a Klunker off Fisher and brought it back to Britain with the intention of spreading the word about these bikes to the British.

He showed the bike to others and exhibited it at the 1978 Olympia cycle show where it was apparently ignored by he other exhibitors. Undeterred, he kept in touch with Fisher and Kelly and imported more early 'Ritchey' bikes that he and others promoted at cycling shows and in the cycling press.

In 1984 he became the founding editor of 'Bicycle Action' the first UK magazine to focus on mountain biking and instigated the 'Fat Tyre Five' the first series of UK mountain bike events that included the 'Wendover Bash'.

Generally speaking the UK cycle industry's reaction to the mountain bike was unenthusiastic sceptical and cautious. There were three main reasons for this:
(1) At the time a good British road bike cost less than £100 and £300+ looked like more than the British public would be prepared to pay.

(2) There were already three off-road cycling traditions in Britain. Cyclo-cross and rough-stuff riding were considered to be niche. Whilst the teenage 'Tracker' bike tradition, though popular, had a make your bike from an old bike ethos and previous attempts to sell bikes into this market had been largely unsuccessful. The exceptions being BMX and 1981 Raleigh Bomber but not at in excess of £300 for a bike. viewtopic.php?f=1&t=334891

(3) The BMX bubble had recently burst, leaving dealers with difficult to sell stock and so cautious about taking risks at a time of economic recession.

There were however a few British companies who were prepared to take the risk. First was the Ridgeback started by Madison owner Errol Drew who imported bikes from the far east from 1983. He first became convinced after seeing mountain bikes at an US trade show in 1982.

Next in early 1984 the Ridgeback was followed by British Cycling manufacturer Saracen who first made mountain bikes for Gary Smith of FW Evans. This was after Smith saw two Ritchey bikes being prepared in his shop for a 1983 trans-Sahara ride that was part of Richard Grant and Richard Ballantine's efforts to promote mountain bikes in the UK.

Other UK cycle manufacturers to begin selling mountain bikes in 1984 were Dawes with their 'Ranger' and Saracen with their own ATB model that was identical to the FW Evans ATB apart from the branding and colour option.

Most of the 1984 British manufacturers used Reynolds 501 mountain bike specific tube sets and Reynolds decision to support mountain bike production was probably key in persuading UK manufactures.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 9:31 am 
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Above - to me, that sounds like the definitive answer to the original question.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:54 pm 
North Wales Deputy AEC
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Word.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 7:18 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
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"Oldest mountain bike in the UK?"
The answer to this depends on how you interpret the question:

For instance is this the oldest individual mountain bike to be brought into the UK?

The first mountain bike model to be imported?

The first US mountain bike to be copied by a UK frame-builder? or model to be copied and sold by a UK bike manufacturer?

Or maybe the oldest surviving UK made mountain bike as the first bikes may not have survived?

Also does Richard Grant's 1977 Gary Fisher Klunker count?

What about the 1981 Raleigh bomber with it's UK 'Tracker bike' inspired frame and US mountain bike size wheels and tyres?

In technological terms the 1980's American mountain bikes were neither original or innovative. However in social and marketing terms they were revolutionary as they persuaded more people to part with more money than with any other design of utility bicycle in history. In the UK they completely swept away the notion that cycling was for people who couldn't afford a car.

One parallel that comes to mind is the success of the original Dyson vacuum cleaner. Dyson knew that it was not enough to just improve the function of the vacuum cleaner without signalling this in the way the product looked. He was right and it quickly became cool to spend four times as much money on mundane utilitarian product that weighed a ton, mainly because it looked so radically different.


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