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 Post subject: Titanium bolts
PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 11:54 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 6:39 pm
Posts: 554
Location: North London
All of my bikes are built out of a selection of used parts, and most see a bit of weather. Chromed bolts often go rusty and spoil things.

Usually I'd look for stainless replacements, but...cost aside, any reason not to use ti? In terms of corrosion and strength will they do the same job with a (tiny) bit less weight? OK to use normal grease/anti-seize on the threads?

Thanks guys!


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 12:03 am 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2010 11:28 am
Posts: 7271
Location: Gorleston-on-sea (If there is a bright center to the universe this is place furthest from it
I normally use a combination of Stainless, Ti, and alloy.

Stainless in high stress areas, Ti in medium, Alloy in low stress, all Ti is very very expensive :wink:


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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 12:47 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:01 pm
Posts: 4765
kermitgreenkona88 wrote:
I normally use a combination of Stainless, Ti, and alloy.

Stainless in high stress areas, Ti in medium, Alloy in low stress, all Ti is very very expensive :wink:



+1


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 Post subject: Re: Titanium bolts
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 12:54 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 6:39 pm
Posts: 554
Location: North London
Cool thanks guys. There's a stem sat here with rusty bolts. I guess I'll go stainless as it's holding the forks in place. :)


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:35 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2011 3:53 pm
Posts: 1135
Location: London
I’ve just tried a rust removal idea I found online.

Take the rusty bolt and leave in a cup of vinegar for week and try come out lie New.

The vinegar goes from clear to brown.

Anyone else tried this?


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 Post subject: Re: Titanium bolts
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 4:26 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 9193
Location: New Forest, UK
Titanium is a horrible material for fasteners. It tends to gall and stick.
https://code541.gsfc.nasa.gov/Uploads_m ... 20133R.pdf
Also, bolt sizes are designed for steel bolts - a Ti one is likely to end up under-specified for the job.
This is an interesting read:
https://janheine.wordpress.com/2018/01/ ... han-steel/

If you get stainless in the right grade, you won't get significant corrosion. However you are more likely to get cracking, as the extra Chrome in the alloy makes it less resistant to cracks.


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 Post subject: Re: Titanium bolts
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 4:50 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:18 am
Posts: 17490
Location: near cwmcarn
I wouldnt use titanium threaded into titanium, eg ti crank bolts into titanium bottom bracket due to galling even with antiseize, but aside from that its easily strong enough for most bicycle applications. I've been using titanium bolts on my bikes since the early 90s & dont recall ever having had a problem.


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 Post subject: Re: Titanium bolts
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:32 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:01 pm
Posts: 4765
scant wrote:
I wouldnt use titanium threaded into titanium, eg ti crank bolts into titanium bottom bracket due to galling even with antiseize, but aside from that its easily strong enough for most bicycle applications. I've been using titanium bolts on my bikes since the early 90s & dont recall ever having had a problem.


+1


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:33 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2010 12:03 am
Posts: 258
A2 80 stainless for high stress areas. Careful of low grade bolts made of cheese. Ok for your water bottle but nowhere critical.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 5:57 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Apr 25, 2010 10:07 pm
Posts: 1769
Dont spare the copper grease on the threads.Its absolutely essential.


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