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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:55 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 12:17 am
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I've seen this term used occasionally but I don't know exactly what it means. Does it refer to a frame... or forks... or perhaps the relationship between them...? I'd appreciate someone letting me know. :D Thanks.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:03 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader

Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 9:48 am
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Location: Bristol
means the frame is designed around longer forks. Initially about 410mm instead of 395mm.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:18 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 12:17 am
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Brilliant - that makes perfect sense to me now. Thanks cce 8)


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:23 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
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Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:36 pm
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Location: Yorkshire, England
After that they started recommending fork length (main/max for frames.

Rigid forks became longer to compensate too.

It all started around 92/93, then about 96 the next step came in for 60mm forks becoming the norm then late 90s/00 80 and 100mm fork.
Stems shortened to compensate, bars also got wider to compensate for the higher front ends too.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:25 pm 
BoTM Winner
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When the term relates to a fork, it refers to a rigid fork that has a longer than standard axle to crown measurement, as cce stated a standard length for is 395mm axle to crown. 410 mm is roughly comparable to a suspension fork with a whopping 40mm travel. A suspension corrected frame has geometry that has been adjusted to be compatible with a suspension fork. When suspension forks first came out, people installed them on frame that were designed for rigid forks, and it raised the front end a little bit, slacking the angles slightly, thus affecting the handling. When bike manufacturers realized shocks weren't just a fad, they changed the geometry of their frames to be more compatible with the front suspension.

A good example of a brand with two lengths of rigid forks is Kona. I think it was around 1995, when they offered some of their bikes (Kilauea, Lava Dome, etc.) with either a front shock, or a rigid suspension corrected P2.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 7:12 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Sat Oct 10, 2009 12:31 pm
Posts: 215
Kona shrunk the head tube by 20mm and extended the blades of the P2 fork by 24mm, making enough space to fit a suspension fork with modest travel. These tweaks didn't quite go far enough: geometry was only correct with the P2 fitted if you used a bigger 2.3" front tyre.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:45 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 12:17 am
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Wow! Many thanks to everybody who posted in what is a comprehensive explanation and answer to my question "What does Suspension Corrected" mean? Only on Retrobike. 8)


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