Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sat Feb 25, 2017 1:18 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:43 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:31 pm
Posts: 679
Location: somewhere in time
Hi,

Through time I've gathered some secondhand tools for wheelbuilding. The latest is a Hozan C-737 spoke tension meter. I'm planning to build some wheels with it in the coming months. Are there any retrobikers here that have worked with the Hozan or similar meters and can say anything about recalibration?

Thanks,
Remko


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:09 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2009 9:44 pm
Posts: 99
Location: bristol
My initial thought is that this tool is more likely to be to be used to compare spoke tension rather than to give an absolute measurement

It is up to the wheel builder to determine the appropriate spoke tension, bearing in mind both the components being used and the
intended use of the wheel

I imagine that there are tables of rims/hubs/spokes and recommended spoke tensions available, however there is no substitute for
a bit of experience and common sense.

I would pay a visit to your LBS and either ask to compare your meter with theirs ( if they have one ) or better still check the spoke
tension of every bike in the shop making a note of type and size of wheel and intended use etc. This way you will have some figures
to use as an 'absolute' reference point for future wheel builds


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:09 pm 
Gold Trader
Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 9:13 pm
Posts: 5106
Location: All you other Iron Men are just imitating
I agree..it's the relative tension that any meter is most use for. They are not really prescision instruments for measuring absolute tension.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:46 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 12:53 pm
Posts: 145
Location: Great Britain
I've always just used the plucked tone of the spokes and the feel of the tightness of the turned nipples to judge relative tension. Are these devices a significant improvement this technique?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:59 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader

Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 9:48 am
Posts: 7031
Location: Bristle
this video details a method for building a calibration device

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgsz7l1GWoI


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 10:09 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:31 pm
Posts: 679
Location: somewhere in time
Thanks for replying so far. I'm just giving it a go to get some feel with it.
Will reply later on.

Attachment:
14873655910701990429743.jpg
14873655910701990429743.jpg [ 171.01 KiB | Viewed 117 times ]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 1:15 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 9:06 pm
Posts: 4656
Location: Herts UK
bikey :) wrote:
I've always just used the plucked tone of the spokes and the feel of the tightness of the turned nipples to judge relative tension. ?


Same here, ping the spokes and listen to the note. I also take two adjacent spokes and squeeze together to see how easily they move.

Comparing to one or more built wheels shows if spoke needs to be tightened or not.

I am not convinced that wheelbuilding is that precise an art unless you are competing at top level. Id say my wheelbuilding skills rate at 6-7/10 and ive never had problem with any of the wheels ive built (<=10)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 2:18 pm 
Gold Trader
Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 20, 2010 9:13 pm
Posts: 5106
Location: All you other Iron Men are just imitating
I'd say pinging the spokes is about the same a kicking a cars tyres to see if it's in good condition.

Evenly tensioned wheels are stronger and will stay true longer. In my opinion it's the only bit of wheel building kit that is worth investing in.


02gf74 wrote:
bikey :) wrote:
I've always just used the plucked tone of the spokes and the feel of the tightness of the turned nipples to judge relative tension. ?


Same here, ping the spokes and listen to the note. I also take two adjacent spokes and squeeze together to see how easily they move.

Comparing to one or more built wheels shows if spoke needs to be tightened or not.

I am not convinced that wheelbuilding is that precise an art unless you are competing at top level. Id say my wheelbuilding skills rate at 6-7/10 and ive never had problem with any of the wheels ive built (<=10)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 4:25 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 12:53 pm
Posts: 145
Location: Great Britain
Depends on the builder. Mine run very straight and true and typically last until the rim walls have worn out.


Last edited by bikey :) on Sat Feb 18, 2017 4:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 18, 2017 4:25 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader

Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 9:48 am
Posts: 7031
Location: Bristle
Antstark wrote:
I'd say pinging the spokes is about the same a kicking a cars tyres to see if it's in good condition.




No less a name than Roger Musson builds all his wheels by plucking.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: pondweed and 17 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group